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Posts tagged North Island

Volcanoes and Lakes of New Zealand’s North Island

38.7S 175.9E

March 7th, 2013 Category: Lakes, Volcanoes

New Zealand – March 6th, 2013

Visible in the center of this image is Lake Taupo, a lake situated in the North Island of New Zealand. Lake Taupo lies in a caldera created by a supervolcanic eruption which occurred approximately 26,500 years ago. With a surface area of 616 square kilometres (238 sq mi), it is the largest lake by surface area in New Zealand.

Two stratovolcanoes can also be observed: Mount Ruapehu, 40 kilometers southwest of Lake Taupo, and Mount Taranaki, on a peninsula in the lower left quadrant. Mount Ruapehu is one of the world’s most active volcanoes and the largest active volcano in New Zealand, as well as the highest point in the North Island. Mount Taranaki, or Mount Egmont, is an active but quiescent stratovolcano.

Vegetation Index of New Zealand’s North and South Islands

41.2S 173.3E

June 21st, 2012 Category: Vegetation Index

New Zealand - January 3rd, 2012

This FAPAR image shows the vegetation index of New Zealand’s North and South Islands. The index of photosynthetic activity is mostly mixed between good (green) and high (rusty red) on both islands, although there is a larger area of an exclusively high index on the North Island. Levels of activity are lowest by the Southern Alps, the mountainous backbone of the South Island.

Tauranga Harbour and Lakes Rotorua and Tarawera, New Zealand

38S 176.2E

December 25th, 2011 Category: Lakes

New Zealand - December 22nd, 2011

This orthorectified image shows the Tauranga Harbour (upper left quadrant, top), Lake Rotorua (rounded, bottom center) and Lake Tarawera (smaller, right of former) on New Zealand’s North Island. The harbour is the location of the Port of Tauranga, New Zealand’s largest export port.

Lake Rotorua is the second largest lake in the North Island of New Zealand by surface area, and covers 79.8km2. With a mean depth of only 10 metres it is considerably smaller than nearby Lake Tarawera in terms of volume of water. It is located in the Bay of Plenty region. The city of Rotorua is sited on its southern shore, and the town of Ngongotaha is at the western edge of the lake. The lake was formed from the crater of a large volcano in the Taupo Volcanic Zone.

Lake Tarawera is the largest of a series of lakes which surround the volcano Mount Tarawera in the North Island of New Zealand. Like the mountain, it lies within the Okataina caldera. It is located 18 kilometres to the east of Rotorua, and five kilometres to the west of the mountain. The lake’s surface area is 39 km².

Great Barrier Island, New Zealand

36.2S 175.4E

December 23rd, 2011 Category: Mountains

New Zealand - December 22nd, 2011

This orthorectified image shows the Great Barrier Island, a large island of New Zealand, situated 100 km to the north-east of central Auckland in the outer Hauraki Gulf. With an area of 285 km2 it is the fourth-largest island of New Zealand’s main chain of islands, with its highest point, Mount Hobson, rising 621 m.

South of the island is the Colville Channel, one of three channels connecting the Hauraki Gulf with the Pacific Ocean to the northeast of Auckland, New Zealand. It lies between the southern end of Great Barrier Island and Cape Colville at the northern tip of the Coromandel Peninsula. The tiny Channel Island lies in the centre of the channel.

The Coromandel Peninsula (visible in the lower part of the full image) lies in the North Island of New Zealand. It is part of the Waikato Region and Thames-Coromandel District and extends 85 kilometres north from the western end of the Bay of Plenty, forming a natural barrier to protect the Hauraki Gulf and the Firth of Thames in the west from the Pacific Ocean to the east. At its broadest point, it is 40 kilometres wide.

Taranaki Bights, Tasman Bay and Nearby Volcanoes, New Zealand

39.2S 174.0E

December 12th, 2011 Category: Lakes, Sediments, Volcanoes

New Zealand - November 25th, 2011

The South Taranaki Bight (middle of image) is the name given to the large bay which extends south and east from the south coast of Taranaki in New Zealand’s North Island. The North Taranaki Bight begins to the north of Cape Egmont (upper part of image).

Sediments can be seen lining the shores of both bights, and the active stratovolcano Mount Taranaki/Egmont can be seen on Cape Egmont. Further inland, Lake Taupo can be seen, with the active stratovolcano Mount Ruapehu to the south of it. The volcano is surrounded by a semi-circle of clouds, but is easily identified by its white, snow-capped peak.

Visible to the south, in the lower part of the image, is Tasman Bay, a large V-shaped bay at the north end of New Zealand’s South Island. Located in the centre of the island’s northern coast, it stretches along 120 km of coastline and is 70 km across at its widest point. It is an arm of the Tasman Sea, lying on the western approach to Cook Strait.

At Tasman Bay’s western extremity, the land around the bay is rough and densely forested. To the east, the land is also steep, with the westernmost points of sea-drowned valleys of the Marlborough Sounds. The land between these two extremes is more gently rolling, and also includes the coastal plains around the mouth of the Waimea River at the bay’s southernmost point.

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