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Posts tagged New Caledonia

Tropical Cyclone Sandra (19P) Tracking Eastward

20.8S 154.6E

March 8th, 2013 Category: Tropical Cyclones

Tropical Cyclone Sandra (19P) – March 7th, 2013

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Track of Tropical Cyclone Sandra (19P) - March 7th, 2013 © Univ. of Wisconsin

Track of TC 19P

Tropical Cyclone Sandra (19P), located approximately 645 nm northwest of Noumea, New Caledonia, has tracked eastward at 06 knots over the past six hours. Maximum significant wave height is 20 feet.

Animated infrared satellite imagery shows deepened central convection over a well-defined low-level circulation center. The initial position is extrapolated from an eye feature on an SSMIS 37ghz image. The initial intensity is slightly higher than the Dvorak estimates from PGTW and KNES to account for the developing eye in the SSMIS microwave image.

Upper-level analysis indicates the system is west of an anticyclone in an area of light to moderate (10-20 knot) easterly vertical wind shear (VWS). Animated water vapor imagery shows ample equatorward outflow with enhanced eastward outflow into deep troughing near the dateline. Additionally, there is slight poleward enhancement to the outflow provided by an upper-level low over eastern Australia.

Tropical Cyclone Sandra (19P) Off Coast of Australia

March 7th, 2013 Category: Tropical Cyclones

Tropical Cyclone Sandra (19P) – March 7th, 2013

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Track of Tropical Cyclone Sandra (19P) - March 7th, 2013 © Univ. of Wisconsin

Track of TC 19P

The area of convection off the coast of Australia (click here for previous images) has been upgraded to Tropical Cyclone Sandra (19P). The system, located approximately 710 nm northwest of Noumea, New Caledonia, has tracked northeastward at 05 knots over the past six hours. Maximum significant wave height is 15 feet.

Animated multispectral satellite imagery shows flaring deep central convection over a well-defined low-level circulation center (LLCC). The initial position is based on an extrapolation from an SSMIS 37ghz image, close to the KNES and ABRF center fixes, with poor confidence due to the extrapolation method.

The initial intensity is based on congruent Dvorak estimates of 45 knots from all reporting agencies (PGTW, KNES, and ABRF). Upper-level analysis indicates the system is west of an anticyclone in an area of light to moderate (10-20 knot) easterly vertical wind shear (VWS).

Animated water vapor imagery shows ample equatorward outflow with enhanced eastward outflow into deep troughing near the dateline. Additionally, there is slight poleward enhancement to the outflow provided by an upper-level low over eastern Australia.

Tropical Cyclone Freda (05P) Northwest of New Caledonia

18.6S 158.4E

January 2nd, 2013 Category: Tropical Storms

Tropical Storm 05P – December 30th, 2012

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Track of Tropical Storm 05P - January 1st, 2013 © Univ. of Wisconsin

Track of TS 05P

Tropical Cyclone Freda (05P), located approximately 285 nm northwest of Noumea, New Caledonia, has tracked southeastward at 04 knots over the past six hours. Maximum significant wave height is 29 feet.

Animated infrared satellite imagery shows the main convection sheared and eroded southeastward of the low level circulation center. Upper level analysis indicates the system is well to the south of a ridge axis in an area of moderate to strong (20-30 knot) vertical wind shear (VWS).

TC 05P is expected to weaken further due to the high VWS; however, after TAU 48, a building subtropical ridge to the south will cause the cyclone to deflect southwestward. An increase in outflow and a slight decrease in VWS will slightly intensify the system at the extended TAUs. The available numerical guidance widely diverge after TAU 48 and offer varying recurvature solutions. There is low confidence in the track forecast after TAU 48 and there is a distinct possibility Freda will completely dissipate after TAU 36.

Coral Reef Encircling New Caledonia

21.5S 165.5E

March 23rd, 2011 Category: Snapshots

New Caledonia - March 23rd, 2011

New Caledonia is a French overseas territory (autonomous overseas collectivity) located in the subregion of Melanesia in the southwest Pacific. It comprises a main island (Grande Terre), the Loyalty Islands, and several smaller islands.

New Caledonia has a total land area of 18,575.5 square kilometres (7,172 sq mi). Grande Terre is by far the largest of the islands, and the only mountainous island. It has an area of 16,372 square kilometres (6,321 sq mi), and is elongated northwest-southeast, 350 kilometres (220 mi) in length and 50 to 70 kilometres (31 to 43 mi) wide.

Here, most of the island of Grand Terre can be observed. Also of note is the coral reef flanking the island and extending northwestward. This reef encircles most of the island provides an important habitat for fish.

New Caledonia Barrier Reef Around the Island of Grand Terre – September 17th, 2009

22.2S 166.4E

September 17th, 2009 Category: Image of the day

New Caledonia - September 3rd, 2009

New Caledonia - September 3rd, 2009

New Caledonia is an island territory of France located in the region of Melanesia in the southwest Pacific. It comprises a main island called Grande Terre (center), the Loyalty Islands (top), and several smaller islands. Approximately half the size of Taiwan, it has a land area of 18,575.5 square kilometres (7,172 sq mi).

The Grande Terre is by far the largest of the islands, and the only mountainous island. It has an area of 16,372 square kilometres (6,321 sq mi), and is elongated northwest-southeast, 350 kilometres (217 mi) in length and 50 to 70 kilometres (31–44 mi) wide.

A mountain range runs the length of the island, with five peaks over 1,500 meters (4,900 ft). The highest point is Mont Panié at 1,628 meters (5,341 ft) elevation.

The island of Grande Terre is surrounded by the New Caledonia Barrier Reef, the second-longest coral reef in the world, after Australia’s Great Barrier Reef, with a length of 1,500 kilometers (930 mi).

The reef encloses a lagoon of 24,000 square kilometers (9,300 sq mi), best viewed in the full-size image, which has an average depth of 25 meters (82 ft). The reefs lie up to 30 kilometers (19 mi) from the shore, but extend almost 200 kilometers (124 mi) to the Entrecasteaux reefs in the northwest. This northwestern extension encloses the Belep Islands and other sand cays.