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Posts tagged Naposta Stream

Argentine Coast from Bahía Blanca to Valdes Peninsula

40.8S 62.9W

February 15th, 2012 Category: Rivers, Sediments

Argentina - February 6th, 2012

Sediments from the Naposta Stream flow past the city of Bahía Blanca and Isla Trinidad, in the southern part of the Province of Buenos Aires, and into the Atlantic Ocean. Moving south down the coastline in the full image, the twin cities of Viedma and Carmen de Patagones can be observed on opposite sides of the Río Negro River.

Continuing further south, one comes to the Valdés Peninsula, an important nature reserve and UNESCO World Heritage Site of about 3,625 km2 (896,000 acres; 1,400 sq mi) in size. Most of the peninsula is barren land with some salt lakes. The largest of these lakes is at an elevation of about 40 m below sea level. The coastline is inhabited by marine mammals, like sea lions, elephant seals and fur seals.

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Sediments in Estuary of Bahía Blanca, Argentina

38.7S 62.2W

January 3rd, 2012 Category: Sediments

Argentina - December 24th, 2011

The sediments in the Estuary of Bahía Blanca, in Buenos Aires Province, Argentina, come from the Arroyo Napostá (Naposta Stream). It is a stream whose watershed is located in Sierra de la Ventana, about 120 km north east of the city of Bahía Blanca. Unfortunately Napostá is heavily contaminated distally, even before reaching the city, probably due to techniques of fertilization carried out in the areas which form its watershed.

Bahía Blanca is a city located in the south-west of the province of Buenos Aires, Argentina, by the Atlantic Ocean. The city has an important sea port with a depth of 45 feet (15 mt), kept constant upstream almost all along the length of the bay, where the Naposta Stream drains. Bahía Blanca means “White Bay”. The name is due to the typical colour of the salt covering the soils surrounding the shores.

Chasicó Lagoon Near Bahía Blanca, Argentina – June 6th, 2011

38.7S 62.2W

June 6th, 2011 Category: Image of the day, Lakes, Sediments

Argentina - May 23rd, 2011

Tan sediments from the Naposta Stream flow past Bermejo Island and Trinidad Island and into the Atlantic Ocean near the city of Bahía Blanca.

The green lake in the upper left corner is the Chasicó Lagoon, about 80 km from Bahía Blanca. As of 2006, it had a surface area of 13000 has. and was growing. Its waters are brackish.

Salt Flats and Fields Across Argentine Landscape Near Bahía Blanca

37.2S 66.4W

October 22nd, 2010 Category: Lakes, Rivers, Salt Flats, Volcanoes

Argentina - October 12th, 2010

Sediments from the Naposta Stream pour past the city of Bahía Blanca and into the Atlantic Ocean, giving the waters along the shoreline a tan tint.

To the west, at the left edge, the Neuquén (above) and Limay (below) Rivers can be observed. The lake surrounding their banks is vegetated and green. Several artificial lakes are clustered around these rivers.

Multiple white areas of salt flats can be observed, scattered across the terrain on the left side of the image. The land on the right side, on the other hand, appears greener; many agricultural fields can be seen scattered across the landscape upon opening the full image.

Also visible in the full image, appearing as a dark brown area north of the lakes near the upper left corner, is the Payun Matru shield volcano. The Payun volcano is notable for large crystals of hematite pseudomorphs after magnetite, of volcanic fumarole origin.

Sediments by Bahía Blanca, Argentina – April 11th, 2010

38.7S 62.2W

April 11th, 2010 Category: Image of the day, Rivers, Sediments

Argentina - February 25th, 2010

Argentina - February 25th, 2010

Bahía Blanca is a city located in the south-west of the province of Buenos Aires, Argentina, by the Atlantic Ocean. The city has an important sea port with a depth of 45 feet (15 mt), kept constant upstream almost all along the length of the bay, into which the Naposta Stream drains.

Bahía Blanca means “White Bay”. The name is due to the typical colour of the salt covering the soils surrounding the shores. The bay (which is actually an estuary) was seen by Ferdinand Magellan during the first circumnavigation around the world. Here, sediments from the Naposta Stream spill into the bay and out into the Atlantic Ocean.

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