Earth Snapshot RSS Feed Twitter
 
 
 
 

Posts tagged Nadi

Severe Tropical Cyclone Evan (04P) Hits Samoa

22.5S 154.6W

December 17th, 2012 Category: Tropical Cyclones

Tropical Cyclone Evan (TC 04P) – December 17th, 2012

Enhanced image

Track of Tropical Cyclone Evan (TC 04P) - December 17th, 2012 © Univ. of Wisconsin

Track of TC 04P

Severe Tropical Cyclone Evan (RSMC Nadi designation: 04F, JTWC designation: 04P) is considered to be the worst tropical cyclone to hit the island nation of Samoa since Severe Tropical Cyclone Val.

The first cyclone of the 2012–13 South Pacific cyclone season, Evan developed from a tropical disturbance on December 9 north-northeast of Fiji. The storm moved east and impacted Samoa and American Samoa; Evan also hit the French islands of Wallis and Futuna and is currently active.

On December 9, the Fiji Meteorological Service’s Regional Specialized Meteorological Centre in Nadi (RSMC Nadi) started to monitor a weak tropical depression, that had developed within the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ), about 700 km (430 mi) to the northeast of Suva. Over the next two days, the depression gradually developed further in an area of low vertical windshear and favourable sea surface temperatures of about 28 – 30 °C (82 – 86 °F), as it was steered eastwards by an upper level ridge of high pressure.

At 1800 UTC on December 11, the United States Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) started to issue advisories on the system and designated it as Tropical Cyclone 04P, after 1-minute sustained winds had become equivalent to a tropical storm while the system’s low level circulation centre was rapidly consolidating. RSMC Nadi then reported early the next day that the system had become a category one tropical cyclone on the Australian tropical cyclone intensity scale and named it Evan, while located about 410 km (250 mi) to the west of Pago Pago on the American Samoan island of Tutuila.

Throughout December 12, Evan continued to be steered eastwards towards the Samoan islands by the upper level ridge, as it quickly intensified further with RSMC Nadi reporting at 1200 UTC that the system had become a category two tropical cyclone. At 1800 UTC the JTWC reported that the system had become equivalent to a category one hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson hurricane scale (SSHS) with 1-minute sustained windspeeds of 120 km/h (75 mph), while it was located about 40 km (25 mi) to the southeast of Apia, Western Samoa.

Over the next 12 hours the system developed a 17 km (11 mi) cloud filled eye on visible imagery, while the systems forward motion started to slow down as it entered a weak steering environment with the upper level ridge of high pressure to the north of the system weakened and a subtropical ridge of high pressure developed to the south of the system.

At 0600 UTC RSMC Nadi reported that Evan had become a category 3 severe tropical cyclone, as it passed over the island of Upolu. During that day the system continued to intensify as started to recurve towards the west, before at 1800 UTC the JTWC reported that Evan had reached its initial peak intensity of 185 km/h (115 mph), which made it equivalent to a category 3 hurricane on the SSHS. On December 16, Evan completed a cyclonic loop, and by December 17, the system strengthened into a Category 4–equivalent cyclone on the SSHS.

Tropical Cyclone René (15P) Situated South-Southeast of Fiji

28.4S 176.4W

February 17th, 2010 Category: Tropical Storms

Tropical Cyclone René (15P) - February 15th, 2010

Tropical Cyclone René (15P) - February 15th, 2010

Enhanced image

Enhanced image

Track of TC 15P - February 16th, 2010 © Univ. of Wisconsin

Track of TC 15P

Tropical Cyclone René (15P), located approximately 440 nautical miles south-southeast of Nadi, Fiji, has tracked west-southwestward at 16 knots over the past six hours. Maximum significant wave height is 24 feet.

Animated multispectral satellite imagery shows a fully exposed low level circulation center (LLCC) with deep convection sheared to the south of the storm. Though Dvorak estimates indicate the system may only be
35 knots, the current intensity of 45 knots is based the principle that the system will wind down slower than the convection dissipates.

TC René is now tracking over unfavorably cool waters while an upper-level low to the northwest is suppressing convection. TC 15P will continue to track generally southwestward as it approaches the axis of the subtropical steering ridge over the next 24 to 36 hours. At the same time, René will gradually dissipate as a significant tropical cyclone due to hostile vertical wind shear and cold sea surface temperatures.

Tropical Cyclone 25P (Lin) Begins Extratropical Transition

April 6th, 2009 Category: Tropical Cyclones

Tropical Cyclone 25P (Lin) - April 5th, 2009

Tropical Cyclone 25P (Lin) - April 5th, 2009

TC 25P (Lin), located approximately 630 nm southeast of Nadi, Fiji, has tracked south-southeastward at 22 knots over the past 6 hours. Maximum significant wave height is 17 feet.

Animated infrared imagery depicts a low level circulation center (LLCC) that has started extratropical transition (ET), becoming elongated to the southeast.

Current intensity estimates have rapidly decreased for the system as the convection associated with the cyclone has become sheared from the LLCC to the Southeast.

Rapidly increasing vertical wind shear associated with a long wave trough southwest of Lin has been the primary factor in the system undergoing ET.

Sea surface temperatures have continued to decrease asTC 25P continues tracking to the south-southeast and have become unfavorable for further development. These factors, coupled with a strong baroclinic boundary, will lead to rapid ET in the next 12 hours.

Viti Levu, Fiji

January 29th, 2009 Category: Snapshots

Fiji - January 28th, 2009

Fiji - January 28th, 2009

Fiji consists of 322 islands (of which 106 are inhabited) and 522 smaller islets. The two most important islands are Viti Levu (the large island on the right side) and Vanua Levu.

The islands are mountainous, with peaks up to 1,300 metres (4,250 ft), and covered with tropical forests. The climate in Fiji is tropical and warm most of the year round.

Viti Levu hosts the capital city of Suva, and is home to nearly three quarters of the population.

Other important towns include Nadi (the location of the international airport, visible below the large bay on the west side of Viti Levu, on the banks of a river), and the second city, Lautoka (the location of a large sugar mill and a seaport, visible above the large bay).

Other islands and island groups include Taveuni and Kadavu (the third and fourth largest islands respectively), the Mamanuca Group (just offshore of Nadi, towards the center), the Yasawa Group (near the top), the Lomaiviti Group, and the remote Lau Group.

The radar image gives a sharp view of the mountainous terrain and of the smaller islands near Viti Levu. However, it does not show clearly the coral reef near Fiji.

Part of the reef, that which is under the black area to the upper left, cannot be seen at all. Another part is slightly visible: a grey line off the southwestern tip of Viti Levu actually marks the silhouette of a segment of the reef.

source Wikipedia

Tropical Cyclone 11P (Hettie) Moves to the South

January 29th, 2009 Category: Tropical Cyclones

Tropical Cyclone 11P (Hettie) - January 28th, 2009 © JTWC

Tropical Cyclone 11P (Hettie) - January 28th, 2009

Tropical Cyclone 11P (Hettie), located approximately 390 nautical miles southeast of Nadi, Fiji, has tracked southward at 5 knots over the past 6 hours.

Animated multispectral satellite imagery shows a fully exposed and weakened low level circulation center located approximately one degree to the northwest of significantly warmed cloud tops/convection.

Twelve hour satellite intensity trends reflect a weakening system with current intensity estimates ranging from 30 to 35 knots.

A QUIKSCAT image confirms a 30 to 35 knot (flagged) system as well. Maximum significant wave height is 10 feet.

The cyclone is forecast to track south to southwestward over the next 24 hours while remaining below warning criteria.

The system will continue to contend with excessive vertical wind shear ahead of a shortwave trough to the West, making regeneration very unlikely.

The JTWC will issue no further warnings, but will closely monitor the system for signs of regeneration.

source JTWC