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Posts tagged Mount Vesuvius

City of Naples Near Mount Vesuvius, Italy

40.8N 14.2E

April 30th, 2012 Category: Volcanoes

Italy - April 28th, 2012

Mount Vesuvius is a stratovolcano in the Gulf of Naples, Italy, about 9 kilometres (5.6 mi) east of Naples and a short distance from the shore. Here, it appears as a dark brown circle ringed by green and then surrounded by the grey and tan expanse of Naples and its metropolitan area.

It is the only volcano on the European mainland to have erupted within the last hundred years. Although it is not currently erupting, Vesuvius is today regarded as one of the most dangerous volcanoes in the world because of the population of 3,000,000 people living nearby and its tendency towards explosive (Plinian) eruptions. It is the most densely populated volcanic region in the world.

Italy, from Naples and Mount Vesuvius to the Gargano Peninsula

40.8N 14.2E

May 17th, 2010 Category: Volcanoes

Italy - April 28th, 2010

Italy - April 28th, 2010

The city of Naples (Italian: Napoli), capital of the region of Campania in southern Italy, is visible along the coast of the Bay of Naples and the Tyrrhenian Sea in the lower part of this image. Above, on Italy’s Adriatic coast, the Gargano Peninsula can be seen as well.

Naples is located halfway between two volcanic areas, the volcano Mount Vesuvius and the Phlegraean Fields. Mount Vesuvius (Italian: Monte Vesuvio) is a stratovolcano located about 9 kilometres (5.6 mi) east of Naples and a short distance from the shore. Here, white clouds hover above its peak.

Mount Vesuvius on the Coast of the Bay of Naples, Italy – March 20th, 2010

40.8N 14.2E

March 20th, 2010 Category: Image of the day, Volcanoes

Italy - February 18th, 2010

Italy - February 18th, 2010

Mount Vesuvius is a stratovolcano east of Naples, Italy, visible in the lower right quadrant of this orthorectified image. It is on the coast of the Bay of Naples, about nine kilometres (six miles) east of Naples and a short distance from the shore.

It is the only volcano on the European mainland to have erupted within the last hundred years. It is best known for its eruption in AD 79 that led to the destruction of the Roman cities of Pompeii and Herculaneum and the death of 10,000 to 25,000 people.

It has erupted many times since and is today regarded as one of the most dangerous volcanoes in the world because of the population of 3,000,000 people living nearby and its tendency towards explosive (Plinian) eruptions. It is the most densely populated volcanic region in the world.

http://www.eosnap.com/?s=orthorectification

Mounts Vesuvius and Etna, Italy

37.7N 14.9E

December 9th, 2009 Category: Volcanoes

Italy - November 17th, 2009

Italy - November 17th, 2009

Two volcanoes are visible near the coast of Italy, Mount Vesuvius by the city of Naples (upper left quadrant) and Mount Etna in Sicily (below image center).

Mount Vesuvius is a stratovolcano on the coast of the Bay of Naples, about nine kilometres (six miles) east of Naples and a short distance from the shore. The height of the main cone has been constantly changed by eruptions but presently is 1,281 m (4,202 ft).

Mount Etna is an active stratovolcano on the east coast of Sicily, close to Messina and Catania. Taller than Mount Vesuvius, it currently stands 3,329 metres (10,922 ft) high, though this varies with summit eruptions; the mountain is 21 m (69 ft) lower now than it was in 1981. Here, its peak is capped with snow, while the summit of the lower Mount Vesuvius is not.

Italy, from Naples to the Gargano Peninsula

41.3N 14.8E

August 2nd, 2009 Category: Lakes, Volcanoes

Italy - July 26th, 2009

Italy - July 26th, 2009

This coast-to-coast image of Italy reaches from Naples on the Tyrrhenian Sea (below) to the Gargano Peninsula on the Adriatic Sea (above).

Of particular interest near Naples are Mount Vesuvius, located slightly inland in the center of the Gulf of Naples coastline, and various offshore islands including Ischia (left) and Capri (right) at either end of the gulf.

Moving across to the other coast, of note on the Gargano Peninsula are Lake Lesina  (left) and Lake Varano (right) along the northwestern shoreline. Greenish sediments framing the coastline highlight the thin strip of land and dunes separating the two lakes from the sea.