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Posts tagged Mount Etna

Haze Over Northern Italy and Sediments Around Gargano Promontory

40.5N 15.0E

March 6th, 2012 Category: Clouds, Rivers, Sediments, Volcanoes

Italy - March 3rd, 2012

Sediments line the Adriatic coast of Italy, particularly around the Gargano Promontory. Gargano is a historical and geographical Italian sub-region situated in Apulia, consisting of a wide isolated mountain massif made of highland and several peaks and forming the backbone of the Gargano Promontory projecting into the Adriatic Sea.

Moving northwards, haze can be seen over the Po Valley in the upper left quadrant. The valley is a plain around the River Po that extends approximately 650 km (400 mi) in an east-west direction, with an area of 46,000 km² (17,756 mi²); it runs from the Western Alps to the Adriatic Sea.

Visible in the lower part of the image, on the island of Sicily, is Mount Etna, its peak capped with white snow. In the full image, some faint ash can be seen spreading eastward from the volcano’s caldera, as Etna recently erupted for the third time in 2012 (click here for an article on the recent eruption).

Mount Etna Erupts for Third Time in 2012, Italy – March 5th, 2012

37.7N 14.9E

March 5th, 2012 Category: Image of the day, Volcanoes

Mount Etna - March 4th, 2012

Visible by the left edge of this image is Mount Etna, in Sicily, Italy. A white cloud of ash and steam can be seen spewing forth from the volcano, which is already erupting for the third time in 2012. Mount Etna is one of the most active volcanoes in the world and is in an almost constant state of activity.

Mount Etna is an active stratovolcano on the east coast of Sicily, close to Messina and Catania. It is the tallest active volcano in Europe, currently standing 3,329 m (10,922 ft) high, though this varies with summit eruptions; the mountain is 21 m (69 ft) higher than it was in 1981. Etna covers an area of 1,190 km² (460 sq mi) with a basal circumference of 140 km, making it by far the largest of the three active volcanoes in Italy.

Volcanic Peaks of Mount Etna and Aeolian Islands, Italy

37.7N 14.9E

February 4th, 2012 Category: Volcanoes

Italy - February 2nd, 2012

The island of Sicily (left) and southern Italy (right) are separated by the Strait of Messina, which connects the Tyrrhenian Sea with the Ionian Sea, within the central Mediterranean.Visible near the eastern coast of Sicily is Mount Etna, and visible off the northern coast are the Aeolian Islands.

Mount Etna is an active stratovolcano on the east coast of Sicily, close to Messina and Catania. It is the tallest active volcano in Europe, currently standing 3,329 m (10,922 ft) high, though this varies with summit eruptions. It also is the highest mountain in Italy south of the Alps. Etna covers an area of 1,190 km² (460 sq mi) with a basal circumference of 140 km. Mount Etna is one of the most active volcanoes in the world and is in an almost constant state of activity.

The Aeolian Islands or Lipari Islands (Italian: Isole Eolie) are a volcanic archipelago in the Tyrrhenian Sea north of Sicily. Scientifically the archipelago is defined as a “volcanic arc”. There are two active volcanoes – Stromboli and Vulcano. The volcanic activity of steaming fumaroles and thermal waters are on most of the islands.

Ash Plume from Mount Etna, Italy – October 16th, 2011

37.7N 14.9E

October 16th, 2011 Category: Image of the day, Volcanoes

Italy - October 13th, 2011

A plume of ash can be seen spewing from Mount Etna and blowing towards the southeast. Mount Etna is an active stratovolcano on the east coast of Sicily, close to Messina and Catania.

It is the tallest active volcano in Europe, currently standing 3,329 metres (10,922 ft) high, though this varies with summit eruptions; the mountain is 21 m (69 ft) higher than it was in 1981. It is the highest mountain in Italy south of the Alps. Etna covers an area of 1,190 km² (460 sq mi) with a basal circumference of 140 km. This makes it by far the largest of the three active volcanoes in Italy.

Mountains and Volcanoes of Sicily, Italy

37.5N 13.9E

October 9th, 2011 Category: Mountains, Volcanoes

Italy - October 3rd, 2011

This orthorectified image shows Sicily’s roughly triangular shape, separated to the east from the Italian region of Calabria through the Strait of Messina.

The terrain of inland Sicily is mostly hilly. Along the northern coast, mountain ranges of Madonie (2000 m), Nebrodi (1800 m) and Peloritani (1300 m) represent an extension of mainland Appennines. The cone of Mount Etna dominates over the eastern coast. In the south-east lie lower Hyblaean Mountains (1000 m).

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