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Posts tagged Mount Egmont

New Zealand: Catlins and Volcanoes

43.5S 170.8E

June 22nd, 2009 Category: Snapshots, Volcanoes

New Zealand - June 7th, 2009

New Zealand - June 7th, 2009

Volcanoes

Volcanoes

Southern tip

Southern tip

Clouds hang over the southern Pacific, surrounding the island country of New Zealand. Most of the land areas are actually clear, except for a few places above the Southern Alps, the mountain range dividing the South Island along its length.

In the full image, part of the North Island is visible at the top right, as is Stewart Island, the country’s third largest island, at the bottom.

The first close-up focuses on the southern tip of the South Island. The southernmost point here is known as Slope Point, in an area known as the Catlins. This region is rugged and sparsely populated area, featuring a scenic coastal landscape and dense temperate rainforest, both of which harbour many endangered species of birds.

The second close-up gives a more detailed look at volcanoes on the western side of the North Island. Mount Taranaki (also known as Mount Egmont) can be seen on the left, and Mount Ruapehu is visible on the right.

Active Volcanoes in New Zealand: Mount Taranaki/Egmont and Mount Ruapehu

February 14th, 2009 Category: Lakes, Volcanoes

New Zealand - February 7th, 2009

New Zealand - February 7th, 2009

Two of New Zealand’s volcanoes, Mount Taranaki (also known as Mount Egmont), west, and Mount Ruapehu, east, are visible here. Lake Taupo can also be seen to the North of Ruapehu.

Mount Taranaki is an active but quiescent stratovolcano in the Taranaki region on the west coast of  North Island. The 2518-metre-high mountain is one of the most symmetrical volcanic cones in the world, similar to Japan’s Mount Fuji. There is a secondary cone, Fanthams Peak, on the south side.

Mount Ruapehu is an active stratovolcano, one of the most active volcanoes in the world. It is also the highest point on New Zealand’s North Island.

Both volcanoes are capped with snow in this image, although Mount Ruahpehu’s summit is higher and has a greater amount.