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Various Cities in Eastern Canada and Northeastern USA – November 1st, 2010

44.1N 74W

November 1st, 2010 Category: Image of the day, Lakes, Rivers

USA and Canada - October 13th, 2010

This image shows portions of eastern Canada and the northeastern USA. The dark blue body of water by the left edge is part of Lake Ontario, on the border between the two countries. The series of long, thin, parallel lakes to the south of Lake Ontario are the Finger Lakes of New York State, USA.

Extending diagonally to the northeast from Lake Ontario is the Saint Lawrence River. It passes the cities of Montreal and Quebec City on its way to the Gulf of Saint Lawrence (not visible here). Another city, Ottawa can also be observed west of Montreal, on the Ottawa River, one of the Saint Lawrence’s tributaries.

Moving southeast to the coast of the USA, the cities of Boston, Providence and New York can be seen as well. Boston is situated on the coast above the hooked peninsula of Cape Cod; Providence is south of Boston by the shores of a series of bays, and part of New York city can be observed by Long Island at the center of the bottom edge.

Saint Lawrence River Connecting Lake Ontario and Gulf of Saint Lawrence, Canada

45.5N 73.5W

September 16th, 2010 Category: Lakes, Rivers

Canada and USA - August 29th, 2010

The medium blue body of water on the left side of this image is Lake Ontario, on the border of the USA and Canada. The northeastern tip of Lake Huron can also be seen just below, along the left edge. South of Lake Ontario are several long, thin, parallel lakes known as the Finger Lakes (best observed in the full image) in New York State, USA.

The Saint Lawrence River runs out of the eastern end of Lake Ontario and passes the cities of Montreal and Quebec City on its way to the Gulf of Saint Lawrence (upper right quadrant). There, it can be seen releasing tan sediments into the gulf.

The city of Ottawa can also be observed west of Montreal, on the Ottawa River, one of the Saint Lawrence’s tributaries. The two rivers converge by Montreal.

Lake Champlain South of the St. Lawrence River, Canada and USA

44.5N 73.3W

April 7th, 2010 Category: Lakes, Rivers

Canada - March 5th, 2010

Canada - March 5th, 2010

Lake Champlain (center) is a natural, freshwater lake in North America, located mainly within the borders of the United States (states of Vermont and New York) but partially situated across the Canada-US border in the Canadian province of Quebec. Here, part of it is frozen, causing the southern half to appear dark blue while the upper half appears bluish-grey.

Although it is smaller than the nearby Great Lakes, Lake Champlain is a large body of fresh water. Approximately 1,130 km2 (440 sq mi) in area, the lake is roughly 180 km (110 mi) long, and 19 km (12 mi) across at its widest point. The maximum depth is approximately 400 feet (120 m). The lake varies seasonally from about 95 to 100 ft (29 to 30 m) above mean sea level.

Lake Champlain is situated in the Lake Champlain Valley between the Green Mountains of Vermont and the Adirondack Mountains of New York, drained northward by the 106 miles (171 km) long Richelieu River into the St. Lawrence River (seen flowing across the upper portion of the image) at Sorel-Tracy, Quebec, northeast and downstream of Montreal.

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