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Posts tagged Mongolia

Lakes in Mongolia’s Great Lakes Depression

50.2N 92.6E

May 7th, 2012 Category: Lakes

Mongolia - May 6th, 2012

As its name would suggest, Mongolia’s Great Lakes Depression contains several large bodies of water. Visible near the top edge is Lake Uvs Nuur, which appears bright white here as its surface is frozen.

In the center of the image, south of Lake Uvs, are Lake Khyargas (above) and Lake Airag (below). The former is significantly larger than the latter. It is dark blue in color, although the eastern half is slightly greener. The smaller Lake Airag is bright green.

Continuing south, several other lakes can be observed near the bottom of the image: Lake Khar, Lake Dörgön and Lake Khar-Us (right to left). These lakes show varying shades of blue, green and brown.

Badain Jaran and Tengger Deserts in Central China

39.6N 102.7E

November 10th, 2011 Category: Deserts, Lakes

China - November 8th, 2011

This thumbnail image stretches from Mongolia (above) to China (below), spanning two deserts: the Badain Jaran Desert and the Tengger Desert. The Tengger Desert, located mostly in the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region of China, covers about 36,700 km2.

The Badain Jaran is a desert which spans the provinces of Gansu, Ningxia and Inner Mongolia, in China. It covers an area of 49,000 sq. kilometers (19,000 sq. miles), and is home to extremely tall dunes, some of which reach a height of 500 meters (1,600 ft.).

Visible near the bottom edge is Qinghai Lake, a saline lake situated in the province of Qinghai. It is the largest lake in China. In the full image, Lake Baikal can be observed far to the north, in Russia.

Badain Jaran Desert and Qinghai Lake, China

39.6N 100.7E

October 29th, 2011 Category: Deserts, Lakes

China - October 28th, 2011

Visible at the center right of this image is the Badain Jaran Desert, in China, spanning the provinces of Gansu, Ningxia and Inner Mongolia. It is located south of the border between China and Mongolia.

The desert covers an area of 49,000 sq. kilometers (19,000 sq. miles) and is home to the tallest stationary dunes on Earth, some of which reach a height of 500 meters (1,600 ft.).

Visible to the south is a more mountainous area and Qinghai Lake, a saline lake situated at an altitude of 3,205 m (10,515 feet) above sea level in a depression of the Tibetan Plateau. It is the largest lake in China, although it has fluctuated in size, shrinking over much of the 20th century, but increasing since 2004.

Vegetation Index from Lake Baikal, Russia, to Mongolia

51.5N 107.1E

August 8th, 2011 Category: Vegetation Index

Russia - July 17th, 2011

This FAPAR image shows the vegetation index in Russian Siberia, near Lake Baikal (upper left quadrant) during the northern hemisphere summer. The index is generally good (green) around the lake and throughout most of the image.

However, photosynthetic activity decreases to low (yellow) as one moves south into Mongolia and east to the right edge of the image. Some areas of high activity (rusty red) can be observed along the forested slopes of the mountains near Lake Baikal.

Fires Near Angara River and Lake Baikal, Russia

57.8N 100.9E

July 17th, 2011 Category: Fires, Lakes

Russia - July 14th, 2011

A cluster of wildfires can be observed near the Angara River in the upper left corner of this image of Russian Siberia. The smoke from the fires was blowing towards the north-northwest at the time the image was acquired.

Visible in the center of the image is Lake Baikal, in Russia. Southwest of its southern tip is Lake Khövsgöl, the largest lake in Mongolia.