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Posts tagged Mitchell River

Sun Glint Highlights Courses of Mitchell, Roe and Prince Regent Rivers in Australia – November 29th, 2010

15.8S 125.2E

November 29th, 2010 Category: Image of the day, Rivers

Australia - November 9th, 2010

Sun glint causes rivers in the Kimberley Region of Western Australia to appear silvery white in color, and highlights there path over land towards the Indian Ocean. The three main rivers visible are, from right to left following their mouths at the coast, the Mitchell River, the Roe River and the Prince Regent River.

Mitchell River rises north east of Sharp Hill and flows in a north westerly direction until discharging into the Indian Ocean via Walmsley Bay near Port Warrender.

The headwaters of the Roe River rise in the Prince Regent Nature Reserve below Bushfire Hill then flow in a north westerly direction. The river discharges into Prince Frederick Harbour to York Sound and out onto the Indian Ocean. The river has five tributaries including; Moran river, Wyulda Creek and Rufous Creek.

The Prince Regent River is a river whose headwaters rise in the Caroline Range near Mount Agnes then flow in a north westerly direction. The river enters and flows through the Prince Regent Nature Reserve and past King Cascade, finally discharging into Saint George Basin and Hanover Bay to the Indian Ocean.

As can be clearly observed thanks to the sun glint, the Prince Regent River runs a uniquely straight course following a fault line for the majority of its length. The river has six tributaries including; Quail Creek, Youwanjela Creek, Womarama Creek and Pitta Creek.

Mission and Mitchell Rivers, Australia – July 19th, 2009

15.4S 141.7E

July 19th, 2009 Category: Image of the day, Rivers

Australia - June 23rd, 2009

Australia - June 23rd, 2009

The Mission (above) and Mitchell Rivers (below), on the west coast of Australia’s Cape York Peninsula, release some sediments into the Gulf of Carpentaria. Water currents create parallel streaks as the sediments diffuse into the waters of the gulf.

The terrain of the peninsula appears to be drying out and become more reddish in color, in contrast to the bright green present during times of flooding in earlier months.

Although the Mitchell River has Queensland’s largest discharge, particularly during periods of extreme rain, it tends to be intermittent and sometimes becomes dry for part of the year.

Great Barrier Reef, Australia – May 23rd, 2009 – EOSnap Celebrates its 1000th Post!

12S 142.5E

May 23rd, 2009 Category: Image of the day, Rivers

Great Barrier Reef, Australia - May 22nd, 2009

Great Barrier Reef, Australia - May 22nd, 2009

Princess Charlotte Bay

Princess Charlotte Bay

Coral Reef

Coral Reef

EOSnap celebrates its 1000th post with this sharp and brightly colored image of the Great Barrier Reef along the Cape York Peninsula, in Queensland, Australia.

The Great Barrier Reef is the largest coral reef system in the world, composed of over 2,900 individual reefs and 900 islands stretching for over 3,000 kilometres (1,600 mi) over an area of approximately 344,400 square kilometres (133,000 sq mi).

The first two close-ups focus on the coral reef on the eastern coast of the Cape York Peninsula.  One detail is of the Princess Charlotte Bay, a part of the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park, which is a habitat for dugong. The Normanby, Bizant, North Kennedy, and Morehead rivers all terminate in this bay.

Torres Strait

Torres Strait

The central close-up portrays the northernmost tip of the Cape York Peninsula and the Torres Strait and islands above it.

The final two close-ups focus on the western coast of the peninsula, which is not part of the Great Barrier Reef. Instead, the coast is fringed by tan sediments, which fade into a yellow-green hue as they mix with the waters of the Gulf of Carpentaria. One close-up includes Mission River (top). The red patches near the river are bare areas of earth, used for mining or construction.

The other detail shows the Mitchell River, which has the state’s largest discharge, particularly when pulsing with monsoonal rains, though it is intermittent and may be dry for part of the year. The last time EOSnap observed this area, the terrain was dark green due to vegetational growth during times of flooding. Now, the terrain appears drier and browner in color.

Mission River

Mission River

Mitchell River

Mitchell River

Flooding in Queensland, Australia

February 17th, 2009 Category: Floods, Rivers

Queensland, Australia - February 15th, 2009

Queensland, Australia - February 15th, 2009

Several rivers running across the Cape York Peninsula, in the Queensland region of Northern Australia, can be seen here.

The eastern coast of Queensland is currently experiencing problems with flooding in cities and towns such as Cairns, Ingham, Townsville and Charters Towers.

Early storms usually start in October and then the wet season carries on from the end of January until April; however, the area is receiving more rain than it has in years, reported the BBC.

This region of Australia appeared much drier the last time it was observed (click here), as the terrain was brownish-red in color. In this current image, taken in the middle of  the wet season, with an olive-colored landscape that enjoys some very vivid green patches.

The tan, sediment-filled river to the south is the Norman River, which originates in the Gregory Range and flows 420 km northwest to the Gulf of Carpentaria. It is joined by two major tributaries, the Clara and Yappar Rivers.

North of the Norman River, the Gilbert-Einasleigh River can be seen running horizontally across the peninsula. It is one of the largest river systems in northern Australia.

Although it is a seasonal stream and discharge can vary greatly depending on the intensity of the monsoon, the Gilbert-Einasleigh has the sixth-highest discharge of any river in Australia.

It is estimated that runoff from the Gilbert-Einasleigh system totals about 2.2 percent of the total runoff from Australia.

Finally, the Mitchell River is visible above the Gilbert-Einasleigh.  The river begins on the Atherton Tableland about 50 kilometres (31 mi) northwest of Cairns, and flows about 750 kilometres (470 mi) northwest across Cape York Peninsula to the Gulf of Carpentaria.

The river’s watershed covers an area of 71,757 km2 (27,706 sq mi). The Mitchell River has the state’s largest discharge, but is intermittent and may be dry for part of the year.

Its tributaries (from east to west) include the Tate River, Lynd River, Walsh River, Palmer River and Alice River.

Fires in Northern Australia

November 8th, 2008 Category: Fires

Fires in Northern Australia - October 30th, 2008

Fires in Northern Australia - October 30th, 2008

Detail of fires in Cape York Peninsula, Australia

Detail of fires in Cape York Peninsula, Australia

In this image we can see two fires in the Cape York Peninsula, in the Queensland region of Northern Australia.

The rivers below are the Mitchell and Alice Rivers, running through the Mitchell-Alice Rivers National Park to the Gulf of Carpentaria on the left.

Fires are important for maintaining the ecological systems in much of Northern Australia and in the Cape York Peninsula in particular.

The land in this region ranges from floodplains to mountains, which receive different amounts of rainfall. The Western side of the peninsula is drier than the eastern side, making fire management there more difficult.

According to the Savannah Explorer, the rangers of the Queensland National Parks have been carrying out “storm burns”, fires lit just before expected rainfall when fuel levels are high.

The purpose of these fires is to encourage the return of native grasses to areas where woody weeds and trees are becoming overly abundant, thus maintaining maximum biodiversity.