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Posts tagged Malaysia

Titiwangsa Mountains Along Malay Peninsula

7.0N 99.9E

June 20th, 2012 Category: Mountains

Malay Peninsula - January 6th, 2012

This wide-swath ASAR image shows the Malay Peninsula (or Thai-Malay Peninsula), a peninsula in Southeast Asia (visible in its entirety in the full image). The land mass runs approximately north-south and, at its terminus, is the southern-most point of the Asian mainland. The area contains the southernmost tip of Burma, Peninsular Malaysia, Singapore, and Southern Thailand.

The image shows the ridges and contours of the Titiwangsa Mountains, part of the Tenasserim Hills system, that form the backbone of the Peninsula. They form the southernmost section of the central cordillera which runs from Tibet through the Kra Isthmus (the Peninsula’s narrowest point) into the Malay peninsula.

Kuala Lumpur and Singapore, Malay Peninsula

3.1N 101.6E

March 24th, 2012 Category: Mountains

Malaysia - January 6th, 2012

This wide-swath ASAR image shows the city of Kuala Lumpur (visible as a bright white area towards the upper left), the capital of Malaysia, on the Malay Peninsula, and the city-state of Singapore (visible at the right edge), just off the peninsula’s coast. The peninsula is a landmass in Southeast Asia that runs approximately north-south and, at its terminus, is the southern-most point of the Asian mainland.

The Titiwangsa Mountains are part of the Tenasserim Hills system, and form the backbone of the Peninsula (more of this range is visible upon opening the full image). The Strait of Malacca separates the Malay Peninsula from the Indonesian island of Sumatra while the south coast is separated from the island of Singapore by the Straits of Johor.

Singapore is a city-state off the southern tip of the Malay Peninsula, 137 km north of the equator. An island country made up of 63 islands, it is separated from Malaysia by the Straits of Johor to its north and from Indonesia’s Riau Islands by the Singapore Strait to its south. Singapore is highly urbanised but almost half of the country is covered by greenery. More land is being created for development through land reclamation.

Vegetation Index of Borneo, Home to One of World’s Oldest Rainforests

0.8N 112.5E

February 17th, 2012 Category: Vegetation Index

Indonesia - January 4th, 2012

This FAPAR image shows the vegetation index of Borneo, the third largest island in the world. It is located north of Java Island, Indonesia, at the geographic centre of Maritime Southeast Asia. The island is divided among three countries: Brunei, Indonesia and Malaysia. 

Borneo is home to one of the oldest rainforests in the world, along with the Daintree Rainforest in Australia and the Amazon rainforest. The island historically had extensive rainforest cover, but the area shrank rapidly due to heavy logging for the needs of the Malaysian plywood industry. Despite this, the vegetation index is generally good (green) throughout the island, with patches of high activity (rusty red) scattered throughout.

Vegetation Index of Malaysia and Sumatra, Indonesia

1.2N 102.8E

January 18th, 2012 Category: Vegetation Index

Malaysia and Indonesia - January 3rd, 2012

This FAPAR image shows the vegetation index of Sumatra (below), an island in western Indonesia, westernmost of the Sunda Islands, and of southern Malaysia (above). The two are separated by the Strait of Malacca. The vegetation index ranges from good (green) to high (rusty red), although it is generally higher along the coastlines of the two countries.

The longest axis of Sumatra runs approximately 1,790 km (1,110 mi) northwest–southeast, crossing the equator near the centre. At its widest point the island spans 435 km (270 mi). The interior of the island is dominated by two geographical regions: the Barisan Mountains in the west and swampy plains in the east.

Sediments from Batang Lupar River, Malaysia

1.2N 111.4E

June 27th, 2011 Category: Rivers

Indonesia and Malaysia - June 21st, 2011

Several rivers can be observed emptying tan sediments into the South China Sea near off the coast of Malaysia, near the border with Indonesia.

The widest of those visible here is the Batang Lupar River. It is famous for its tidal bore, which comes in from the river mouth and fills up the river very rapidly in the course of about 10 minutes. The wave crest at Sri Aman is up to 2 to 3 metres high.

 

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