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Posts tagged Mackenzie River

Sediments Pour from Mackenzie River into Beaufort Sea, Canada – November 11th, 2010

69.5N 133.3W

November 11th, 2010 Category: Image of the day, Rivers, Sediments

Canada - September 7th, 2010

Brown sediments pour from the mouth of the Mackenzie River into the Beaufort Sea, part of the Arctic Ocean. Multiple braided channels can be seen in the delta area by the mouth. The sediments are darkest brown near the shore, where they are densest, and become lighter tan and then green as they disperse into the sea.

The river, whose mean discharge at the mouth is 10,700 cubic metres per second (380,000 cu ft/s), originates in the Great Slave Lake, in Canada’s Northwest Territories, and flows north. It is the longest river in Canada at 1,738 kilometres (1,080 mi).

Sediments from Mackenzie River, Canada – August 19th, 2010

69.0N 135.9W

August 19th, 2010 Category: Image of the day, Rivers, Sediments

Canada - July 21st, 2010

The Mackenzie River spills a load of dense brown sediments into the Beaufort Sea, part of the Arctic Ocean. Its mean discharge is 10,700 cubic metres per second (380,000 cu ft/s). The Mackenzie and its tributaries drain 1,805,200 square kilometres (697,000 sq mi).

The river originates in the Great Slave Lake, in Canada’s Northwest Territories, and flows north. It is the longest river in Canada at 1,738 kilometres (1,080 mi) and, together with its headstreams the Peace and the Finlay, the second longest river in North America at 4,241 kilometres (2,635 mi) in length.

Mackenzie River Passing Great Bear Lake, Canada

66.1N 120.3W

July 6th, 2010 Category: Lakes, Rivers

Canada - June 2nd, 2010

Canada - June 2nd, 2010

The Mackenzie River carries brown sediments past the frozen Great Bear Lake (upper right) in Canada’s Northwest Territories, on its way towards the Beaufort Sea and Arctic Ocean. It is the longest river in Canada at 1,738 kilometres (1,080 mi).

Many other lakes dot the landscape near the river. Some are blue, having thawed during the warmer summer months, while many others are still frozen. The Mackenzie River itself generally freezes over in October and begins to thaw in May, meaning it is only navigable for approximately five months of the year.

Great Bear Lake on the Arctic Circle, Canada – May 28th, 2010

66.0N 121W

May 28th, 2010 Category: Image of the day, Lakes

Canada - April 27th, 2010

Canada - April 27th, 2010

Great Bear Lake, covered in ice, to the right, is the largest lake entirely within Canada (Lake Superior and Lake Huron straddling the Canada-US border are larger). It is the third largest in North America, and the seventh largest in the world.

The lake is situated on the Arctic Circle between 65 and 67 degrees of northern latitude and between 118 and 123 degrees western longitude, 186 m (610 ft) above sea level. It empties through the Great Bear River (Sahtúdé) into the Mackenzie River.

Great Bear Lake has a surface area of 31,153 km2 (12,028 sq mi) and a total volume of 2,236 km3 (536 cu mi). Its maximum depth is 446 m (1,463 ft) and its average depth 71.7 m (235 ft). The total shoreline is 2,719 km (1,690 mi) and the total catchment area of the lake is 114,717 km2 (44,292 sq mi).

Mackenzie River Spilling Sediments into the Arctic Ocean off Canadian Coast

September 28th, 2009 Category: Rivers

Canada - September 3rd, 2009

Canada - September 3rd, 2009

Mackenzie Rivermouth

Mackenzie Rivermouth

Despite some cloud cover, the Mackenzie River can be see flowing north across Canada into the Arctic Ocean. The river, which originates in Great Slave Lake, in the Northwest Territories, is the longest river in Canada at 1,738 kilometres (1,080 mi).

Together with its headstreams the Peace and the Finlay, it is the second longest river in North America at 4,241 kilometres (2,635 mi) in length.

The Mackenzie and its tributaries drain 1,805,200 square kilometers. Its mean discharge is 10,700 cubic metres per second. Here, it can be seen spilling brown sediments into the Arctic Ocean.

The large marshy delta of the Mackenzie River (see close-up) provides habitat for migrating snow geese, tundra swans and brant, as well as a breeding habitat for other waterfowl. The estuary is also a calving area for Beluga whales.