Earth Snapshot RSS Feed Twitter
 
 
 
 

Posts tagged Luzon

Vegetation Index of Luzon and Other Islands in Philippines Archipelago

October 3rd, 2010 Category: Vegetation Index

Philippines - September 5th, 2010

This FAPAR image shows the vegetation index of the Philippines, an archipelago of 7,107 islands with a total land area, including inland bodies of water, of approximately 300,000 square kilometers (116,000 square miles).

Luzon, the largest island in the Philippines (top left) has the highest vegetation index, particularly along the coastline. This is evidenced from the rusty red bands lining the shores. The high mountains in its center also have a good to high index (mottled green and red), as they are covered in a mixture of Luzon tropical pine forests and Luzon montane rain forests.

Mountains of Mindanao Island, Philippines

7.8N 124.8E

April 23rd, 2010 Category: Mountains

Philippines - March 5th, 2010

Philippines - March 5th, 2010

Mindanao is the second largest and easternmost island in the Philippines. It is also one of the three island groups in the country, along with Luzon and Visayas. The island group of Mindanao encompasses Mindanao island itself and the Sulu Archipelago to the southwest. The island group is divided into six regions, which are further subdivided into 25 provinces.

The mountains of Mindanao include both complex structural mountains and volcanoes. Paralleling the east coast, from Bilas Point in Surigao del Norte to Cape Agustin in southeast Davao, is a range of complex mountains known in their northern portion as the Diwata Mountains. This range is low and rolling in its central portion.

The east-facing coastal regions of Davao and Surigao del Sur are marked by a series of small coastal lowlands separated from each other by rugged forelands which extend to the water’s edge. Offshore are numerous coral reefs and tiny islets.

Typhoon Mirinae (23W) Still Moving Towards Philippines

15.7N 126.5E

October 29th, 2009 Category: Tropical Cyclones

Typhoon Mirinae - October 29th, 2009

Typhoon Mirinae - October 29th, 2009

Track of Mirinae - October 29th, 2009 © Univ. of Wisconsin

Track of Mirinae

Enhanced image

Enhanced image

Typhoon Mirinae (23W), located approximately 650 nautical miles east of Manila, Philippines, has tracked westward at 15 knots over the past six hours. Maximum significant wave height is 30 feet.

The Philippine weather bureau has placed four areas under storm signal number one as Mirinae intensified and continued moving toward Luzon, northern Philippines.

The Philippine Atmospheric Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA) forecast Thursday that TY 23W will make a landfall Friday night and bring heavy rains to the provinces of Isabela, Aurora, Northern Quezon and Polillo Islands.

PAGASA has advised residents in these areas, especially those living in low-lying areas and near mountain slopes, to prepare for possible flashfloods and landslides. irinae is expected to bring more rain, and have winds more powerful than Typhoon Parma (19W) which battered northern Luzon early this month.

Typhoon Mirinae (23W) Expected to Make Landfall Over Luzon

15.9N 133.5E

October 28th, 2009 Category: Tropical Cyclones

Typhoon Mirinae - October 27th, 2009

Typhoon Mirinae - October 27th, 2009

Track of Mirinae - October 27th, 2009 © Univ. of Wisconsin

Track of Mirinae

Enhanced image

Enhanced image

Typhoon Mirinae (23W), located approximately 305 nautical miles west-northwest of Guam, has tracked westward at 17 knots over the past six hours. Maximum significant wave height is 17 feet.

Animated infrared satellite imagery and an AMSR-E image show a significant increase in organization and intensity over the past 6 hours. A well defined microwave eye is evident in the AMSR-E pass with deep convection extending completely around the southern half of Mirinae.

Upper level analysis shows that the poleward outflow channel has linked with the mid-latitude trough to the north of Mirinae and has helped to fuel rapid intensification over the past 6 hours.

The influence from the trough on the poleward outflow will begin to diminish over the next 12 to 24 hours as the mid-latitude flow re-aligns and becomes more zonal.

TY 23W is expected to continue strengthening through TAU 72 prior to landfall with Luzon; decreasing as it tracks over Luzon into the South China Sea. Land interaction will slow Mirinae from TAU 72 through 120 as it tracks over Luzon, but the cyclone will see a slight increase in track speed upon re-entering the South China Sea.

Typhoon Lupit (22W) North of Philippines

17.9N 124.4E

October 22nd, 2009 Category: Tropical Cyclones

Typhoon Lupit Near Taiwan - October 22nd, 2009

Typhoon Lupit Near Taiwan - October 22nd, 2009

Track of Lupit - October 21st, 2009 © Univ. of Wisconsin

Track of Lupit

Enhanced image

Enhanced image

Typhoon 22W (Lupit), located approximately 370 nautical miles northeast of Manila, Philippines, has tracked west-southwestward at 6 knots over the past six hours. Maximum significant wave height is 31 feet.

Recent animated infrared imagery shows a strong system with tightly curved banding, deep convection over the low level circulation center (LLCC) and good radial outflow. An AMSR-E pass shows multiple deep convective bands wrapping into a well formed eye-like feature in the lower levels (37ghz). An upper level image (89ghz), however, shows the eye-like feature open on the northern side of the LLCC.

The system is moving into a region of weaker steering as it moves out of the periphery of the subtropical ridge (STR) to the northeast and is yet to come fully under the influence of the STR to the west. As a result of the system being in a weak steering environment, numerical guidance is in poor agreement as to the track of TY 22W.

Two very distinct scenarios exist for the track. The first scenario is for the system to continue slowly tracking to the west-southwest towards the northern tip of Luzon under the influence of a finger of the STR to the west. Under this scenario, around TAU 72, a short-wave midlatitude trough will pass through the area, erode the finger of the STR, and the system will become quasi stationary in the vicinity of the Strait of Luzon.

The second scenario, on the other hand, calls for the system to rapidly turn to the northeast between TAU 12 and 24 under the influence of a westerly surge from the northern side of the STR to the west. In this scenario, the system would then be picked up by the flow around the STR to the east and would then track into the midlatitude westerlies.

A thorough analysis of the deep layer mean flow around the STR to the west of the system indicates that Lupit is currently south of the STR axis, and it is unlikely to be affected by flow on the northern side of the STR. For this reason, the forecast favors the first scenario, but the second scenario remains plausible.