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Posts tagged Limay River

Vegetation on Both Sides of the Andes: Chile and Argentina by FAPAR

35.7S 70.8W

December 27th, 2009 Category: Climate Change

Chile and Argentina - December 20th, 2009

Chile and Argentina - December 20th, 2009

This FAPAR image shows the Fraction of Absorbed Photosynthetically Active Radiation of parts of Chile and Argentina. In FAPAR images, the color spectrum over land runs from red (1.0), to green, to yellow and white (0.0).

Much of the land visible in Chile is green to dark red, indicating good to high photosynthetic activity. Upon opening the full image, the green gradually fades to yellow and white, indicating low activity, as one moves towards the country’s arid north.

The land in Argentina appears mostly white to yellow. Some green areas of higher activity can be observed in Argentina along the banks of the Neuquén (above) and Limay (below) Rivers. Upon opening the full image, some green areas can be seen to the north as well.

Steppe-like Plains of Argentine Patagonia

38.6S 68W

November 27th, 2009 Category: Lakes, Rivers

Argentina - October 6th, 2009

Argentina - October 6th, 2009

The landscape of Argentine Patagonia appears mostly tan and brown in color, as it is for the most part a region of vast steppe-like plains. These plains rise in a succession of abrupt terraces about 100 metres (330 ft) at a time. In the hollows of the plains are ponds or lakes of brackish and fresh water.

Several such lakes can be seen in the upper left quadrant, near the Neuquén River (above) and the Limay River (below). All of these are artificial: the reservoir to the south was created by the El Chocón Dam, the two to the north are part of the Cerros Colorados Complex, and the final one to the east is Pellegrini Lake.

Valdés Peninsula and Lakes in Argentine Patagonia

42.5S 64W

October 10th, 2009 Category: Lakes, Rivers

Argentina - September 30th, 2009

Argentina - September 30th, 2009

Protruding from the coast of Chubut Province  in Argentine Patagonia is the Valdés Peninsula (or Península Valdés in Spanish). Two gulfs border the stretch of land connecting the peninsula to the mainland: Golf San José (above) and Golfo Nuevo (below).

Although much of the 3,625 km² peninsula is barren land, its salt lakes and shoreline provide an important habitat for sea mammals and birds, and is recognized as a nature reserve and UNESCO World Heritage site.

In the upper left quadrant, several lakes can be seen clustered around the Neuquén River (above) and the Limay River (below). All of the lakes are artificial: the southernmost one is a reservoir created by the El Chocón Dam, the pair of reservoirs to the north are part of the Cerros Colorados Complex, and the one to the east is Pellegrini Lake, made by filling a natural depression with water from the Neuquén River.

Lakes Near Neuquén and Limay Rivers, Argentina Patagonia

April 25th, 2009 Category: Lakes

Argentina - April 7th, 2009

Argentina - April 7th, 2009

Several lakes can be seen clustered around rivers in Argentine Patagonia. The city of Neuquén is located at the intersection of the Neuquén River (above) and the Limay River (below).

The southernmost lake is a reservoir created by the El Chocón Dam, used for regulating the Limay River, irrigation and hydroelectricity.

The two lakes to the North are also reservoirs created for hydroeletric purposes. They are part of the Cerros Colorados Complex, a group of dams and generation facilities.

The kidney-shaped lake to the East, just north of the fork is Pellegrini Lake, is an artificial lake created by filling a natural depression with water from the Neuquén River.

Disturbance over Patagonia, Argentina

January 29th, 2009 Category: Lakes, Rivers

Disturbance over Patagonia, Argentina - January 27th, 2009

Disturbance over Patagonia, Argentina - January 27th, 2009

Close-up of lakes

Close-up of lakes

A disturbance (top) looms over the provinces of Neuquén and Río Negro, in Argentine Patagonia.

The Neuquén River and several lakes can be seen south of the disturbance. The city of Neuquén is located at the fork in the river. The river south of the fork is called the Limay.

North of the fork is Pellegrini Lake, is an artificial lake  at approximately and 270 m above sea level. This reservoir was originally a natural depressed area that was later filled with water brought by a derivation channel from the nearby Neuquén River.

West of Pellegrini Lake is the Cerros Colorados Complex, a group of dams and hydroelectricity generation facilities.

The body of water south of the Cerros Colorados Complex is a reservoir created by the El Chocón Dam, which is part of the same engineering scheme as the Complex. The dam  is used to regulate the flow of the Limay River, for irrigation, and for the generation of hydroelectricity.

source Wikipedia