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Posts tagged Lena River

Thick Band of Smoke South of Buor-Khaya Gulf, Russia

67.2N 124.5E

July 22nd, 2012 Category: Fires, Rivers

Russia – July 13th, 2012

A band of thick smoke crosses the central and lower parts of this image of Russia. Visible at the top of the image is the Buor-Khaya Gulf or Buor-Khaya Bight, one of the most important gulfs of the Laptev Sea. Visible entering the gulf on the left side is the Lena River, which can also be seen curving downwards across the image, until it is covered by the thick cloud of smoke in the lower left quadrant.

Smoke East of Lena River, Russia

67.6N 125.8E

July 17th, 2012 Category: Fires, Rivers

Russia – July 13th, 2012

A thick swath of smoke sweeps diagonally across the left side of this image of Russian Siberia. Visible west of the smoke is the Lena River, the easternmost of the three great Siberian rivers that flow into the Arctic Ocean (the other two being the Ob River and the Yenisei River). It is the 11th longest river in the world and has the 9th largest watershed. It is the greatest river whose watershed is entirely within national ranges of Russia.

Smoke Near Vilyuy and Lena Rivers, Russia

63.7N 121.6E

July 18th, 2011 Category: Fires, Rivers

Russia - July 14th, 2011

This image of Russian Siberia shows smoke from fires north of Lake Baikal (click here for more images of fires in Russia).

Just north of the smoke is a segment of the Lena River, the easternmost of the three great Siberian rivers that flow into the Arctic Ocean. In the full image, the Vilyuy River, the longest tributary of the Lena, can be seen flowing across the Central Siberian. Plateau to its confluence with the Lena.

Lena and Vilyuy Rivers in Eastern Siberia, Russia

60.3N 120.4E

February 16th, 2011 Category: Rivers

Russia - January 16th, 2011

The two white lines cutting across this winter image of Russian Siberia are the Lena River (below) and its left bank tributary, the Vilyuy River (above). Both appear white because their surfaces are frozen.

The Lena is the easternmost of the three great Siberian rivers that flow into the Arctic Ocean and the 11th longest river in the world. The Vilyuy River is the longest tributary of the Lena in eastern Siberia.

Lena River Delta and Bunge Land Between Russian Islands

75.3N 139.0E

August 26th, 2010 Category: Rivers, Sediments

Russia - August 4th, 2010

The delta of the Lena River appears as a large brown, fan-shaped area in Russia’s Sakha Republic, in the lower left quadrant. Dark brown sediments empty into the Laptev Sea, part of the Arctic Ocean.

Visible north of the delta are Kotelny Island and Faddeyevsky Island, part of the Anzhu Islands subgroup of the New Siberian Islands. They are situated between the Laptev Sea and the East Siberian Sea in the Russian Arctic.

They are usually named as separate islands on average maps, however, they are connected by a flat, low-lying, plain known as Bunge Land. This area is tan in color, as opposed to the dark brown terrain of the rest of the island.

Bunge Land is a huge empty and almost barren intermediate zone. Sandy and flat, its area is 6,200 kmĀ². Since it rises only to a maximum height of 8 m above sea level, Bunge Land is flooded during storm surges, except for a very small area in the southeast that rises to an elevation of 11 to 21 m above sea level. The area that is periodically submerged accounts for over 80% of the total surface and is practically devoid of vegetation.

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