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Posts tagged Lake Ulungur

Lakes Zaysan and Ulungur in Kazakhstan and China

47.3N 87.1E

May 17th, 2011 Category: Lakes, Mountains

Kazakhstan, Russia and China - May 2nd, 2011

Visible at the top of this image are the Altai Mountains, in southwestern Siberia, Russia near the borders with China, Kazakhstan and Mongolia.

Visible to the south is Lake Zaysan, in eastern Kazakhstan, in a hollow between the Altai and Tarbagatai Mountains. A freshwater lake, at around 1,810 km² (700 mi²) it is the largest lake in the East Kazakhstan Province.

Moving eastward, one can see Lake Ulungur, in Fuhai County, Xinjiang, China. With an area of 1,035 square kilometers, the lake is one of China’s ten largest freshwater lakes.

Multiple Lakes Around the Sayan Mountains in Asia

49.8N 90.7E

October 26th, 2010 Category: Lakes, Mountains, Rivers

Russia, Mongolia, Kazakhstan and China - October 13th, 2010

The Sayan Mountains, capped in snow, have a central position in this image. Multiple lakes can be observed in the lowlands near the foot of the range.

In the upper right quadrant, in Russia, is the Krasnoyarskoye Reservoir, appearing as a thick dark blue line. The reservoir is located along the Yenisei River.

To the south, across the mountains near the center right, is Lake Uvs Nuur. It is situated on the border between Russia’s Tuva Republic (north) and Mongolia (south). Several other lakes can be seen further south, in Mongolia’s Great Lakes Depression.

In the lower left quadrant, the lake that appears as a long, thick, jagged line is Lake Zaysan, in Kazakhstan. To the east, is the brighter green Lake Ulungur, in China’s Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region.

Lakes in Mongolia’s Uvs Province and China’s Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region

November 23rd, 2009 Category: Lakes

Mongolia and China - October 7th, 2009

Mongolia and China - October 7th, 2009

Uvs is one of the 21 aimags (provinces) of Mongolia. It is located in the west of the country, 1336 km away from the national capital Ulan Bator. Its capital is Ulaangom, which lies 936m above sea level.

Parts of the steppe in this province are protected as the World Heritage Site Uvs Nuur Basin. In the north, just out of view, the province borders the Russian Federation for 640km, in the east 340 km of border lies between Uvs and Zavkhan province. In the south and west it borders with Khovd and Bayan-Ölgii provinces for 200km each.

The province occupies 4.45% of the national territory, which is equivalent of 69,585 sq. km. Sixty percent of the total area of the province belongs to the mountainous climatic zone, and 40% to the Gobi semi-desert.

The province is named after Mongolia’s biggest lake, Uvs Nuur, touching the top edge of the image. Also visible here are the other five major lakes of Mongolia’s Great Lakes Depression: Lakes Khyargas (below Lake Uvs), Airag (smaller, just south of the former), Khar-Us (southwest of Lake Khyargas), Khar (east of the former) and Dörgön (south of Lake Khar).

Another body of water, Lake Ulungur, is visible near the center of the left edge. This lake, as well as the rest of the land in the lower left quadrant, belongs to China’s Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region.

Lakes Near the Taklamakan Desert, China

42.0N 87.0E

October 19th, 2009 Category: Lakes

China - September 24th, 2009

China - September 24th, 2009

Several lakes are visible in this image of western China, despite being near to the arid Taklamakan Desert. Of note on the eastern end of the desert is the dry basin of the former Lake Lop Nur, now containing an area of salt fields that appear as a light yet bright blue rectangle.

Visible just north of the Taklamakan desert is Lake Bosten, a dark blue freshwater lake located 57 km northeast of Korla, Xinjiang in the Bayin’gholin Mongol Autonomous Prefecture. With an area of about 1,000 square kilometers, it is the largest lake in Xinjiang.

Further north, appearing greenish in color, is Lake Ulungur, in Fuhai, Xinjiang. Covering an area of 1,035 square kilometers, the lake is one of China’s ten largest freshwater lakes. Lake Ulungur is divided into two sections: Buluntuo Lake and the smaller Jili Lake.

Finally, the lower end of Lake Zaysan, a freshwater lake in eastern Kazakhstan, can be seen in the upper left corner. The ca. 1,810 km² (700 mi²) lake is located in a hollow between the Altai and Tarbagatai Mountains.

Lake Ulungur Below the Altai Mountains, China – October 15th, 2009

47.2N 87.3E

October 15th, 2009 Category: Image of the day, Lakes, Rivers

China - September 4th, 2009

China - September 4th, 2009

Freshwater Lake Ulungur is located in Fuhai, Xinjiang, China. Its total surface area is 1,035 square kilometers, although it is divided into two sections: the larger Buluntuo Lake and the smaller Jili Lake.

The lake is fed by the Ulungur River. Further water is diverted into it by a canal built through the watershed between the Ulungur and Irtysh rivers.

North of the lake arise the snow-capped Altai Mountains, the source of the Irtysh and Ob Rivers. The mountain range runs through central Asia, where Russia, China, Mongolia and Kazakhstan come together. As they extend southeast, the peaks gradually become lower and merge into the high plateau of the Gobi Desert.

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