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Posts tagged Lake San Martín

Milky Blue of Argentine Glacial Lakes

49.5S 72.6W

February 27th, 2013 Category: Lakes

Argentina and Chile – January 25th, 2013

Visible in the lower left quadrant of this image are three bright blue glacial lakes in Argentine Patagonia: Argentino Lake, Lake Viedma and Lake San Martín (below to above).

A glacial lake is a lake with origins in a melted glacier. They are formed when a glacier erodes the land, and then melts, filling the hole or space that they have created. The scouring action of the glaciers pulverizes minerals in the rock over which the glacier passes. These pulverized minerals become sediment at the bottom of the lake, and some of the rock flour becomes suspended in the water column, giving the water a milky blue color.

Lakes in Argentine and Chilean Patagonia

49.5S 72.6W

November 18th, 2012 Category: Lakes, Mountains

Chile and Argentina – November 16th, 2012

Several lakes can be seen by the Andes Mountains and Chile-Argentina border in this image of Patagonia. The northernmost is known as Lake General Carrera (Chilean side) or Lake Buenos Aires (Argentine side). It has a surface of 1,850 km² of which 970 km² are in Chile and 880 km² in Argentina, making it the biggest lake in Chile, and the fourth largest in Argentina. The lake is of glacial origin and drains to the Pacific Ocean on the west through the Baker River.

Visible to its south, also dark blue in color, is known as Cochrane Lake in Chile and Pueyrredón Lake in Argentina. The Argentine portion of the lake has a surface of 150 km2, while the portion in Chile covers 175 km2. It is a glacier fed lake.

Continuing southward, three light blue lakes can be seen: Lake O’Higgins/San Martín (the former name is used in Chile, the latter in Argentina), Viedma Lake and Argentino Lake. All three are glacial lakes, and their milky color is due to rock flour suspended in their waters.

Sediments Along Coast of Argentine Patagonia – September 28th, 2012

50.5S 70.7W

September 28th, 2012 Category: Image of the day, Lakes, Sediments

Argentina – September 24th, 2012

Sediments line the coast of the Argentine provinces of Santa Cruz and Tierra del Fuego, both part of Patagonia, from the San Jorge Gulf to the Mitre Peninsula.

Visible parallel to the west coast are the Andes Mountains, along the border with Chile. Visible by the mountains are several bright blue glacial lakes (from north to south): Lake O’Higgins/San Martín (the former name is used in Chile, the latter in Argentina), Viedma Lake and Argentino Lake.

Milky Blue Glacial Lakes by Chile-Argentina Border

49.5S 72.6W

May 3rd, 2012 Category: Lakes, Mountains

Argentina and Chile - April 28th, 2012

The snow-capped Andes mark the border area between Chile (left) and Argentina (right). Several bright blue glacial lakes can be observed in the middle section of the image, their milky color due to rock flour suspended in their waters. The lakes are, from top to bottom, Lake O’Higgins/San Martín (the former name is used in Chile, the latter in Argentina), Viedma Lake and Argentino Lake.

Lake O’Higgins / San Martín consists of a series of finger-shaped flooded valleys. It has a surface area of 1,058 km² and a shoreline length of 525 km. Viedma Lake is a major elongated trough lake formed from melting glacial ice. It is approximately 50 miles (80 kilometers) long. Argentino Lake is the biggest freshwater lake in Argentina, with a surface area of 1466 km2, an average depth of 150 m, and a maximum depth of 500 m.

Milky Blue Glacier Lakes in Patagonia by Chile-Argentina Border

49.5S 72.6W

February 10th, 2012 Category: Glaciers and Ice Caps, Lakes

Argentina - February 6th, 2012

Glacial lakes appearing bright blue in color can be observed in Patagonia by the Andes Mountains and the border between Chile (west) and Argentina (east). The lakes are, from top to bottom, Lake O’Higgins/San Martín (the former name is used in Chile, the latter in Argentina), Viedma Lake and Argentino Lake.

Lake O’Higgins / San Martín is located between the Aysén Region and the Santa Cruz Province. It has a surface area of 1,058 km², an elevation of 250 metres above mean sea level, and a shoreline length of 525 km. Viewed from above, the lake consists of a series of finger-shaped flooded valleys, of which 554 km² are in Chile and 459 km² in Argentina, although sources differ on the precise split, presumably reflecting water level variability. The lake is the deepest in the Americas with a maximum depth of 836 metres near O’Higgins Glacier, and its characteristic milky light-blue color comes from rock flour suspended in its waters.

Viedma Lake, approximately 50 miles (80 kilometers) long, is a major elongated trough lake formed from melting glacial ice. Lake Viedma is fed primarily by the Viedma Glacier at its the western end. The Viedma Glacier measures 3 miles (5 kilometers) wide at its terminus at Lake Viedma. The brown landscape is a result of ice scouring, which left virtually no vegetation on the steep-walled valleys. Water from lake Viedma flows into Lake Argentino through the La Leona River.

Lago Argentino is the biggest freshwater lake in Argentina, with a surface area of 1466 km2 (maximum width: 20 mi). It has an average depth of 150 m, and a maximum depth of 500 m. The lake lies within the Los Glaciares National Park, in a landscape with numerous glaciers and is fed by the glacial meltwater of several rivers, the water from Lake Viedma brought by the La Leona River, and many mountain streams. Its drainage basin amounts to more than 17000 km2.

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