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Posts tagged Lake Sakakawea

Lake Oahe and Partially Frozen Lake Sakakawea, USA

44.8N 100.6W

April 2nd, 2012 Category: Lakes, Rivers

USA - December 23rd, 2011

The Missouri River winds its way across this image of North and South Dakota, USA. Two large reservoirs can be seen along the river’s course: Lake Sakakawea (upper left quadrant) and Lake Oahe (lower right quadrant).

Lake Sakakawea is a reservoir in the Missouri River basin in central North Dakota. It is the third largest man-made lake in the United States, and was created by the Garrison Dam. Here, the western part of the lake appears frozen. Snow can be seen dusting the terrain across the left side of the image as well.

Lake Oahe, on the other hand, is not frozen. It is a large reservoir behind Oahe Dam on the Missouri River beginning in central South Dakota and continuing north into North Dakota in the United States. The lake has an area of 370,000 acres (1,500 km2) and a maximum depth of 205 ft (62 m). By volume, it is the fourth-largest reservoir in the US.

Lakes Sakakawea and Oahe on the Missouri River, USA

47.7N 102.3W

May 16th, 2011 Category: Lakes, Rivers

USA - May 1st, 2011

The Missouri River winds its way across this image of North and South Dakota, USA. To the north, it stands out as a thick tan line against the snow-covered terrain. Further south, where there is no snowfall, its coloring shifts back and forth from tan to green.

In the upper part of the thumbnail image, Lake Sakakawea can be seen along the river in North Dakota. It is an artificial reservoir, created by the Garrison Dam.

Upon opening the full image, Lake Oahe can be observed, also along the Missouri River, stretching across the North Dakota – South Dakota border. Like its northern neighbor, it is also an artificial reservoir, created by the Oahe Dam.

Lake Oahe Along the Missouri River, USA

44.8N 100.6W

November 21st, 2010 Category: Lakes, Rivers

USA - November 8th, 2010

The long, winding, thick line parallel to the left edge of this image is Lake Oahe, a large reservoir behind Oahe Dam on the Missouri River. The reservoir begins in central South Dakota and continues north into North Dakota in the United States.

In the full image, a second lake can be seen to the north, also on the Missouri River: Lake Sakakawea in North Dakota. Like its neighbor to the south, it is an artificial reservoir, created with the completion of Garrison Dam.

Audubon Lake and Lake Sakakawea South of Minot, in North Dakota, USA

48.2N 101.2W

November 10th, 2010 Category: Lakes

USA - December 11th, 2009

Lake Sakakawea, visible near the bottom, is a reservoir in the Missouri River basin in central North Dakota, USA. It averages between 2 and in width and is 14 mi wide at its widest point (Van Hook arm).

The section of the lake furthest east is part of the Audubon National Wildlife Refuge, which consists of 14,735 acres (60 km²). Most of the refuge area is a lake known as Audubon Lake, which has 100 islands that provide nesting habitat for birds. Another 3,020 acres (12 km²) consists of wetlands crucial to numerous bird and mammal species.

While most of the rest of the image is dotted by rectangular fields, the city of Minot can be seen as a white patch near the top, on the Drift Prairie. With a population of 36,567 at the 2000 census, Minot is the fourth largest city in the state of North Dakota.

From Plains and Lakes to Mountains in Northwestern USA

43.4N 111.7W

October 25th, 2010 Category: Lakes, Mountains

USA - October 21st, 2010

The northern and southeastern portions of this image of the north- and central-western USA are mostly covered by flat plains, while the southwestern portions are dominated by various ridges of mountains.

Three lakes are visible in the upper half of the image (from left to right): the Fort Peck Reservoir in Montana, Lake Sakakawea in North Dakota and Lake Oahe in South Dakota.

A fourth lake can be observed near the mountains in the lower left corner: the Great Salt Lake in Utah. The white areas surrounding the lake, particularly to the southwest, are large expanses of salt flats.

Visible north of the Great Salt Lake is the Wasatch Range, a mountain range that stretches through Utah and Idaho. To the east of the lake, on a horizontal axis, are the Uinta Mountains, a subrange of the Rocky Mountains.

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