Earth Snapshot RSS Feed Twitter
 
 
 
 

Posts tagged Lake Albert

Lakes Victoria, Kyoga and Albert in Uganda

0.3N 32.5E

February 29th, 2012 Category: Lakes

Uganda- January 4th, 2012

This orthorectified wide-swath ASAR image shows several lakes in Uganda: Lake Victoria (bottom), Lake Kyoga (above center) and Lake Albert (upper left corner). The city of Kampala, the capital of Uganda and the largest city in the country, can be seen as a white area by the northern shores of Lake Victoria.

Lake Victoria is an African Great Lake and the largest lake on the continent by surface area, at 68,800 square kilometres (26,600 sq mi). It is the second largest freshwater lake by surface area in the world. Lake Kyoga is a large shallow lake complex of Uganda, about 1,720 km2 (660 sq mi) in area and at an elevation of 914 m. The Victoria Nile flows through the lake on its way from Lake Victoria to Lake Albert. Lake Albert is another one of the African Great Lakes – the seventh-largest lake in Africa, at about 160 km (100 mi) long and 30 km (19 mi) wide, with a maximum depth of 51 m (168 ft).

Sediments in Southern, Swampy Section of Lake Albert, Uganda and DRC

1.7N 30.9E

January 4th, 2012 Category: Lakes

Uganda and the Democratic Republic of the Congo - December 25th, 2011

Lake Albert – also Albert Nyanza and formerly Lake Mobutu Sese Seko – is one of the African Great Lakes. It is Africa’s seventh-largest lake, and the world’s twenty-seventh largest lake by volume. Lake Albert is located in the center of the continent, on the border between Uganda and the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

Lake Albert is the northernmost of the chain of lakes in the Albertine Rift, the western branch of the East African Rift. It is about 160 km (100 mi) long and 30 km (19 mi) wide, with a maximum depth of 51 m (168 ft), and a surface elevation of 619 m (2,030 ft) above sea level.

Lake Albert is part of the complicated system of the upper Nile. Its main sources are the Victoria Nile, ultimately coming from Lake Victoria to the southeast, and the Semliki River, which issues from Lake Edward to the southwest. The water of the Victoria Nile is much less saline than that of Lake Albert. Its outlet, at the northernmost tip of the lake, is the Albert Nile (which becomes known as the Mountain Nile when it enters South Sudan).

At the southern end of the lake, where the Semliki comes in, there are swamps. Here, sediments can be seen tinging the waters in this section of the lake. Farther south loom the mighty Ruwenzori Range, while a range of hills called the Blue Mountains tower over the northwestern shore. The few settlements along the shore include Butiaba and Pakwach.

Vegetation Index of DRC and Neighbors Near Lake Victoria

2S 29.1E

March 25th, 2011 Category: Vegetation Index

DRC and Neighbors - March 23rd, 2011

The full version of this FAPAR image shows the vegetation index of the Democratic Republic of the Congo (left half of image) and of Uganda, Rwanda, Burundi and Tanzania (top to bottom, right half).

Several lakes can be observed forming a chain across the middle of the image. These are (from top to bottom): Lake Albert and Lake Edward, on the DRC-Uganda border, Lake Kivu, on the DRC-Rwanda border, and Lake Tanganyika, on the DRC-Burundi border (full visible in full image; northern tip partially obscured by clouds in thumbnail). Visible to the east of these lakes is the significantly larger Lake Victoria, in Uganda and Tanzania.

The vegetation index is highest (rusty red) to the west of the lakes, in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Photosynthetic activity becomes progressively weaker – first green, indicating a good index, then yellow, indicating a low index – as one moves from west to east. It is also less strong to the north.

Fires in Sudan, Ethiopia and Uganda

8.3N 30.7E

January 29th, 2011 Category: Fires

Ethiopia - January 17th, 2011

Smoke covers the right side of this image, along the Ethiopia-Sudan border. In the full image, a cluster of fires can be seen in or near the Boma National Park, in Sudan close to the Ethiopian border. These fires are releasing smoke towards the north-northwest.

In the lower part of the fulll image, other fires can be seen further south, in Uganda, near Lake Albert. The smoke from these fires is blowing in the opposite direction, towards the south-southeast.

Finally, even more fires can be seen around the Sudd, is a vast swamp in southern Sudan that appears here as a large green area. The fires, both in, just east and just west of the Sudd are releasing smoke towards the southwest.

Lakes on Border of the Democratic Republic of the Congo

1.7S 27.2E

August 22nd, 2010 Category: Lakes

Democratic Republic of the Congo - August 5th, 2010

The left side of this image of the Democratic Republic of the Congo appears slightly hazy due to smoke from fires. The center is partially covered by clouds, while on the right side several lakes are visible along the DRC’s border with Uganda, Rwanda and Burundi (top to bottom).

These lakes are (from top to bottom): Lake Albert and Lake Edward, on the DRC-Uganda border, Lake Kivu, on the DRC-Rwanda border, and the northernmost end of Lake Tanganyika, on the DRC-Burundi border. Partially visible at the right edge, in Uganda and Tanzania, is Lake Victoria.

About Us

Earth Observation

Organisations

Archive

December 2018
M T W T F S S
« Mar    
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31  

Categories


Bulletin Board


Featured Posts

Information

49


Take Action

Widgets