Earth Snapshot RSS Feed Twitter
 
 
 
 

Posts tagged Lake Alakol

Preserving the Ecosystem of Alakol Lake, Kazakhstan – June 4th, 2013

46.1N 81.7E

June 4th, 2013 Category: Lakes MODISTerra

Kazakhstan – June 4th, 2013

The ecosystem of Alakol Lake is located in unique natural and climatic conditions, which together with the favorable geographical location determine the attractiveness of this territory for a huge number of the globally valuable avifauna species. Main threats to the lake and its wetlands include uncontrolled poaching of water fowl and wild boars, which led to decline in the number of fauna species. Other threats include erosion, which needs to be prevented through introduction of sustainable water-saving irrigation technologies and training land users new alternative technologies, decreasing degradation processes in conditions of climate aridization.

Lakes and Mountains of Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan – October 13th, 2012

42.3N 77.2E

October 13th, 2012 Category: Lakes, Mountains

Kazakhstan – October 10th, 2012

Several lakes can be observed in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan, northwest of the Taklamakan Desert (lower right) in China. Nearest the desert is Lake Issyk Kul, an endorheic lake in the northern Tian Shan mountains in eastern Kyrgyzstan. Although it is surrounded by snow-capped peaks, it never freezes.

North of Lake Issyk Kul is Lake Balkhash, in southeastern Kazakhstan, belonging to an endorheic basin shared by Kazakhstan and China, with a small part in Kyrgyzstan. The basin drains into the lake via seven rivers, most notably the Ili River, which is fed from precipitation (largely vernal snowmelt) from the mountains of China’s Xinjiang region.

Visible to the east of Lake Balkhash, near the right edge of the image, is Lake Alakol, located in east central Kazakhstan. The lake is the northwest extension of the region known as the Dzhungarian Gate (Alataw Pass), a narrow, fault-bounded valley that connects the southern uplands of Kazakhstan with arid northwest China.

Lakes Alakol and Sasykkol, Kazakhstan

46.1N 81.7E

August 26th, 2012 Category: Lakes, Rivers

Kazakhstan – August 23rd, 2012

Two lakes can be observed in this image: Lake Alakol (blue) and Lake Sasykkol (light green). The latter is a lake in the eastern part of Kazakhstan. It has an area of 600 km² (736 km² when water level in the lake is high), average depth of 3.3 m and maximum depth of 4.7 m.

Lake Alakol is located in the Almaty and Shyghyz provinces, east central Kazakhstan. The lake is the northwest extension of the region known as the Dzhungarian Gate (Alataw Pass), a narrow valley that connects the southern uplands of Kazakhstan with arid northwest China.

Lake Alakol, a salt lake, has a drainage basin of 65,200 km² and receives water periodically from the southerly draining Urdzhar River at the north end of the lake. Two alluvial fans are visible where mountain streams cut through the faulted landscape (southwest side of lake).

Smoke Stretching from Russia to Kazakhstan – July 25th, 2012

46.1N 81.7E

July 25th, 2012 Category: Fires

Russia – July 23rd, 2012

A thick cloud of smoke blows in an arched shape between Russia (above) and Kazakhstan (below). The smoke probably originates from the wildfires in central Russia that have been affecting the region over the last month, and then blows southward over Kazakhstan, where it partially obscures Lake Balkhash (lower left) and just reaches the western shores of Lake Alakol (right of the former). In the full image, plumes of smoke from individual blazes can be seen in Russia the upper right corner.

Lake Alakol in Kazakhstan and Lake Bosten in China

43.7N 84.1E

October 2nd, 2011 Category: Deserts, Lakes

China - August 24th, 2011

Visible in the top left corner of this image of Asia is Lake Alakol, in east central Kazakhstan. The lake is the northwest extension of the region known as the Dzhungarian Gate (Alataw Pass), a narrow valley connects the southern uplands of Kazakhstan with arid northwest China.

Moving across the mountains and into China, another lake can be observed near the northern part of the Taklamakan Desert: Bosten Lake, a freshwater lake in the Bayin’gholin Mongol Autonomous Prefecture. Covering an area of about 1000 km2 (together with adjacent small lakes), it is one of the largest inland freshwater lakes in China.