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Posts tagged Kyzyl Kum

Kyzyl Kum Desert and Shrinking Aral Sea – October 12th, 2012

43.7N 62.1E

October 12th, 2012 Category: Deserts, Image of the day, Lakes

Aral Sea – October 9th, 2012

Visible in the upper left quadrant of this image is the shrinking Aral Sea, now separated into three basins. Here, water in the northern and southwestern basins appears greenish blue from phytoplankton growth, while the southeastern basin appears much shallower and drier, and is ringed by white salt flats.

South and east of the shrunken sea is the Kyzyl Kum, the 11th largest desert in the world. It is located in Central Asia in the doab between the rivers Amu Darya and Syr Darya, and is divided between Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan and Turkmenistan. It covers about 298,000 km2 (115,000 sq mi). The territory consists mainly of an extensive plain at an altitude up to 300 m (980 ft) above sea level, with a number of depressions and highlands. Most of the area is covered with sand-dunes.

Snow in Kyzyl Kum Desert Near Aydar Lake, Uzbekistan and Kazakhstan

41.2N 67.9E

February 9th, 2011 Category: Lakes, Rivers

Uzbekistan and Pakistan - January 16th, 2011

Snow can be seen in the Kyzyl Kum Desert in Uzbekistan and southern Kazakhstan near Aydar Lake. The area around the lake and part of the Syr Darya River in the upper right corner is free of snow.

However, some snow is present by the reservoir created by the Sharadara Bogeni dam at Chardarya, Kazakhstan. The Syr Darya seems to connect the reservoir to Aydar Lake.

The Kyzyl Kum and Karakum Deserts

40.8N 67.0E

August 7th, 2009 Category: Lakes, Rivers

Kazakhstan - June 8th, 2009

Kazakhstan - June 8th, 2009

The terrain of Kazakhstan (above), Uzbekistan (middle) and Turkmenistan (below) seems to alternate between rivers and sandy deserts. Part of the Aral Sea can also be noted at the top left, as well as Aydar Lake just right of the center.

The Syr Darya River can be seen at the top, the Amu Darya through the center, and the Morghāb River near the bottom. There are agricultural settlements along all the rivers.

Stretching between the former two is the Kyzyl Kum, the 11th largest desert in the world, divided between Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan and (partly) Turkmenistan. It covers about 298,000 km² (approximately 115,000 sq mi).

The territory consists mainly of an extensive plain at an altitude up to 300 m (about 1000 feet) above sea level, with a number of the depressions and highlands. Most of the area is covered with sand-dunes, while in the North-West large areas are covered with takirs (clay coatings) and there are also some oases.

To the south, between the Amu Darya and the Morghāb, is the Karakum Desert. It occupies about 70 percent, or 350,000 km², of the area of Turkmenistan.

The population is sparse, with an average of one person per 6.5 km² (one person per 2.5 square miles). Rainfall is equally sparse, where precipitation comes maybe once a decade.

Aral Sea and Nearby Deserts

44.8N 59.8E

July 26th, 2009 Category: Lakes, Rivers

The Aral Sea - June 30th, 2009

The Aral Sea - June 30th, 2009

Close-up

Close-up

The arid  landscape of Kazakhstan (above), Uzbekistan (center) and Turkmenistan (below) includes two important stretches of desert: the Kyzyl Kum and the Karakum.

The Kyzyl Kum, or Qyzylqum, Desert stretches between the the Amu Darya (below) and Syr Darya (above, right) Rivers. It is the 11th largest desert in the world.

The Karakum, on the other hand, lies south of the Amu Darya. It occupies about 70% of the land in Turkmenistan.

This area region is punctuated by several bodies of water, including the ever-smaller Aral Sea (top) and the Sarygamysh Lake (lower left).

The close-up focuses on the South Aral Sea, which further divided into eastern and western basins in 2003. Here, the western basin shows some green swirls of algae or sediments, while the eastern basin appears very shallow.

An “Accidental” Lake: Aydar Lake, Uzbekistan

40.8N 67.0E

June 11th, 2009 Category: Lakes

Aydar Lake, Uzbekistan - June 8th, 2009

Aydar Lake, Uzbekistan - June 8th, 2009

The Aydar Lake is part of the man-made Aydar-Arnasay system of lakes, which covers an area of 4,000 square kilometres (1,500 mi²).

This system includes 3 brackish water lakes (Aydar Kul, Arnasay and Tuzkan) located in the saline depressions of the south-eastern Kyzyl Kum (now in Uzbekistan and Kazakhstan).

The lakes are the unintentional byproduct of Soviet planning. Up to the middle of the last century the Arnasay lowland remained a dry salt pan during most of the year.

In the early sixties the Syr Darya River was dammed up and the Chardarya Irrigation Dam was also constructed. When a raging flood occurred in 1969, floodgates were opened as the dam’s capacity was inadequate to cope with the flow.

As a result, between February 1969 and February 1970 almost 60% of the Syr Darya’s average annual water flow (21 km³) was drained from the Chardarya Reservoir into the Arnasay lowland. In such a way new lakes were unintentionally created.

Since 1969 the Aydar Lake has regularly received the waters of the Syr Darya River when they overflow the capacity of the Chardarya Reservoir. This has gradually filled up the natural cavity of Arnasay lowland to create the second largest lake in the region (after the remains of the Aral Sea).

In 2005 the Aydar Lake contained 44.3 cubic kilometers of water. Today the area of the Aydar Lake amounts 3,000 square kilometres (1,200 mi²). It is nearly 250 km (160 miles) long and up to 15 km (9 miles) wide.

Here, many irrigated fields are visible to the east and south of the lake. To the northwest, however, the land does not appear to be used for agriculture.