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Posts tagged Köroğlu Mountains

Mountains of Central and Eastern Turkey

38.7N 34.2E

July 15th, 2010 Category: Mountains

Turkey - July 4th, 2010

Turkey - July 4th, 2010

Central and eastern Turkey, a transcontinental Eurasian country, can be observed here. The territory of Turkey is more than 1,600 kilometres (1,000 mi) long and 800 km (500 mi) wide, with a roughly rectangular shape.

The Asian part of the country, Anatolia, consists of a high central plateau with narrow coastal plains, between the Köroğlu and Pontic mountain ranges to the north and the Taurus Mountains to the south. Eastern Turkey has a more mountainous landscape and is home to the sources of rivers such as the Euphrates, Tigris and Aras, and contains Lake Van and Mount Ararat, Turkey’s highest point at 5,165 metres (16,946 ft).

Upon opening the full image, these areas of mountain ranges and plains can be observed clearly. The higher elevations near the northern coast are capped with clouds, while those to the south are clear.

Gulfs of the Sea of Marmara Near Istanbul, Turkey

41.0N 28.9E

November 13th, 2009 Category: Snapshots

Turkey- October 22nd, 2009

Turkey- October 22nd, 2009

The Bosphorus Strait, connecting the Black Sea (above) to the Sea of Marmara (below) divides the city of Istanbul, Turkey, in two. The Sea of Marmara has an area of 11,350 km² (280km x 80km) with the greatest depth reaching 1,370 m.

In this orthorectified image, some of the large, indented bays of the sea are visible cutting into the Turkish terrain on either side of the Koroglu Mountains. These include the Gulf of Izmit, center right, whose waters appear light grey, and the Gulf of Gemlik, center bottom. The body of water visible inland between these two gulfs is Lake Iznik.

Istanbul and the Bosphorus Strait – July 21st, 2009

41.0N 28.9E

July 21st, 2009 Category: Image of the day

Turkey - July 15th, 2009

Turkey - July 15th, 2009

The city of Istanbul, Turkey, lines the Bosphorus Strait and the northern shores of the Sea of Marmara. Many ships can be seen moving through the strait and in the sea.

One large group is clustered off the coast of Istanbul west of the southern entrance to the strait, and another is further to the east near Tuzla, a headland on the coast at the eastern limit of Istanbul.

Also visible in the Sea of Marmara are the nine Princes’ Islands, located between the Bosphorus and Tuzla. Inland, the reservoir created by the Omerli Dam is visible east of the strait, and the large Lake Iznik touches the bottom edge of the orthorectified image. In between Lake Iznik and the Sea of Marmara above is the western part of the Koroglu Mountains.

Mountains and Plains of Turkey

May 1st, 2009 Category: Snapshots

Turkey - April 5th, 2009

Turkey - April 5th, 2009

Turkey is a transcontinental Eurasian country with a territory more than 1,600 kilometres (1,000 mi) long and 800 km (500 mi) wide and a roughly rectangular shape. Turkey’s area, inclusive of lakes, occupies 783,562 square kilometres (300,948 sq mi).

Turkey is encircled by seas on three sides: the Aegean Sea to the west, the Black Sea to the north and the Mediterranean Sea to the south. Turkey also contains the Sea of Marmara in the northwest.

The European section of Turkey, in the northwest, is Eastern Thrace, and forms the borders of Turkey with Greece and Bulgaria.

The Asian part of the country, Anatolia (also called Asia Minor), consists of a high central plateau with narrow coastal plains, between the Köroğlu and East-Black Sea mountain range to the north and the Taurus Mountains to the south.

The uneven north Anatolian terrain running along the Black Sea resembles a long, narrow belt. This region comprises approximately one-sixth of Turkey’s total land area. As a general trend, the inland Anatolian plateau becomes increasingly rugged as it progresses eastward. Here, the coastal plains appear green and fertile while the central plateau is brown and seems drier.

Eastern Turkey has a more mountainous landscape, which is covered with snow in this image. This region is home to the sources of rivers such as the Euphrates, Tigris and Aras, and contains Lake Van and Mount Ararat, Turkey’s highest point at 5,165 metres (16,946 ft).

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