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Posts tagged Kimberley

Bush Fires in Tropical Savannas of Western Australia

15.9S 125.6E

April 24th, 2013 Category: Fires

Australia – April 24th, 2013

As the dry season, which usually runs from May to October, is about to begin in the Kimberley region of Western Australia, bush fires blaze in the area’s tropical savannas. When such fires occur in April and May, they usually burn themselves out after just a few days, since early in the dry season vegetation has dried enough to burn but is still wet enough that they can’t grow out of control.

Fire Near Coast of the Kimberley, Australia

14.6S 125.6E

September 19th, 2012 Category: Fires

Australia – September 3rd, 2012

Smoke hovers over the Kimberley, one of the nine regions of Western Australia. It is in the northern part of Western Australia, bordered on the west by the Indian Ocean, on the north by the Timor Sea, on the south by the Great Sandy and Tanami Deserts, and on the east by the Northern Territory. A large fire can be observed near the coast in the upper right quadrant, releasing a thick plume of smoke.

Fires Near Coast in the Kimberley, Australia – June 2nd, 2012

16S 125.0E

June 2nd, 2012 Category: Image of the day, Sediments

Australia - May 31st, 2012

Fires can be seen in the Kimberley, one of the nine regions of Western Australia, particularly near the coast. The region is located in the northern part of Western Australia, bordered on the west by the Indian Ocean, on the north by the Timor Sea, on the south by the Great Sandy and Tanami Deserts, and on the east by the Northern Territory. Although the Kimberley has a tropical monsoon climate, it is currently in its dry season, which lasts from May to October. This increases the likelihood of wildfires in the region.

Sun Glint Highlights Courses of Mitchell, Roe and Prince Regent Rivers in Australia – November 29th, 2010

15.8S 125.2E

November 29th, 2010 Category: Image of the day, Rivers

Australia - November 9th, 2010

Sun glint causes rivers in the Kimberley Region of Western Australia to appear silvery white in color, and highlights there path over land towards the Indian Ocean. The three main rivers visible are, from right to left following their mouths at the coast, the Mitchell River, the Roe River and the Prince Regent River.

Mitchell River rises north east of Sharp Hill and flows in a north westerly direction until discharging into the Indian Ocean via Walmsley Bay near Port Warrender.

The headwaters of the Roe River rise in the Prince Regent Nature Reserve below Bushfire Hill then flow in a north westerly direction. The river discharges into Prince Frederick Harbour to York Sound and out onto the Indian Ocean. The river has five tributaries including; Moran river, Wyulda Creek and Rufous Creek.

The Prince Regent River is a river whose headwaters rise in the Caroline Range near Mount Agnes then flow in a north westerly direction. The river enters and flows through the Prince Regent Nature Reserve and past King Cascade, finally discharging into Saint George Basin and Hanover Bay to the Indian Ocean.

As can be clearly observed thanks to the sun glint, the Prince Regent River runs a uniquely straight course following a fault line for the majority of its length. The river has six tributaries including; Quail Creek, Youwanjela Creek, Womarama Creek and Pitta Creek.

Flora and Vegetation Index of the Kimberley Region, Western Australia

April 19th, 2010 Category: Vegetation Index

Australia - March 5th, 2010

Australia - March 5th, 2010

The Kimberley is one of the nine regions of Western Australia. It is located in the northern part of Western Australia, bordered on the west by the Indian Ocean, on the north by the Timor Sea, on the south by the Great Sandy and Tanami Deserts, and on the east by the Northern Territory.

This more arid geography to the south is mirrored in this FAPAR image:  southern areas appear yellow, indicating low photosynthetic activity, while coastal areas appear green, thus showing a good vegetation index.

With regards to flora, much of the Kimberley is chiefly covered in open savanna woodland dominated by low bloodwood and boab trees with Darwin stringybark and Darwin woollybutt eucalypts in the wetter areas.

The red sandy soil of the Dampier Peninsula in the south is known for its characteristic pindan wooded grassland while in the more fertile areas like the Ord valley the trees are grasslands of Chrysopogon, Aristida, Dicanthium and Xerochloa (rice grass) in the wetter valleys.

The banks of the Ord, Fitzroy and other rivers are home to a greater variety of vegetation while in sheltered gorges of the high rainfall north there are patches of rainforest. There are also areas of mangrove in river estuaries where the coast is flatter.

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