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Posts tagged Kerch Strait

Mouth of Don River and Kerch Strait Connected to Sea of Azov

46.0N 36.0E

October 17th, 2011 Category: Rivers

Sea of Azov - October 5th, 2011

This orthorectified image¬†shows the Sea of Azov, a sea in the southern part of Eastern Europe. It is linked by the narrow (about 4 km-wide) Strait of Kerch to the Black Sea to the south, and is bounded on the north by mainland Ukraine, on the east by Russia, and on the west by the Ukraine’s Crimean Peninsula.

The sea is largely affected by the inflow of numerous rivers, which bring sand, silt, and shells, forming numerous bays, limans, and narrow sandbanks called spits. Because of these deposits, the sea bottom is relatively smooth and flat with the depth gradually increasing toward the sea centre. The Don and Kuban are the major rivers that flow into it. In this image, the mouth and lower portions of the Don River appear bright white.

Green Sediments by the Kerch Strait, Ukraine and Russia – May 23rd, 2010

45.3N 36.6E

May 23rd, 2010 Category: Image of the day, Sediments

Black Sea - April 28th, 2010

Black Sea - April 28th, 2010

The Kerch Strait connects the Black Sea and the Sea of Azov, separating the Kerch Peninsula in the west from the Taman Peninsula in the east. The strait is 4.5 kilometres (2.8 mi) to 15 kilometres (9.3 mi) wide and up to 18 metres (59 ft) deep.

The most important harbor is the Crimean city of Kerch (Ukraine) which gives its name to the strait, formerly known as the Cimmerian Bosporus.

The Russian side of the strait contains the Taman Bay encircled by the Tuzla Spit to the south and Chushka Spit to the north. The most important settlement on the Russian side is Taman where an important cargo port is under construction.

Russian Land Between Seas

49.1N 44.9E

July 31st, 2009 Category: Lakes, Rivers

Russia - June 21st, 2009

Russia - June 21st, 2009

The Russian land north of the Caucasus Mountains and the border with Georgian stretches between the Ukraine (left) and Kazakhstan (right).

The Volga River and Volgograd Reservoir form a right angle at the center, from the Volga carries on to its delta in the Caspian Sea (lower right). East of that right angle are a series of salt lakes, most of which lie in Kazakhstan.

Also near the center are the Don River and Tsimlyansk Reservoir, from which the Don continues until it reaches the Sea of Azov (lower left). The Sea of Azov then connects to the Black Sea via the Kerch Strait.

Sediments are present along the shores of all three seas, though they are particularly intense at the mouths of the Don and the Volga Rivers.

The Kerch Strait

January 11th, 2009 Category: Snapshots

The Kerch Strait - December 15th, 2008

The Kerch Strait - December 15th, 2008

The Kerch Strait connects the Black Sea and the Sea of Azov. It separates the Kerch Peninsula in eastern Crimea from the Taman peninsula in western Russia.

The strait is 4.5 to 15 km (3-11 mi) wide and up to 18 meters deep. The most important harbor is the city of Kerch, in Crimea.

An algal bloom can be seen along both the Russian and Crimean shorelines. Some of the lakes just inland on the Russian side also appear very green with algae.

The brown area along the Russian shoreline is swampland or wetlands, not used for agriculture unlike much of the surrounding area.

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