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Fire by Appalachian Mountains, USA

36.5N 84.8W

November 22nd, 2012 Category: Fires

USA – November 21st, 2012

A plume of smoke from a fire by the Appalachian Mountains and the Kentucky-Tennessee, USA, border area can be see blowing south-southwestwards, towards the ridges of the mountain range. The mountains are characterized by a ridge and valley pattern, with dark brown ridges easily distinguishable via satellite from bright greet valeys .

Hurricane Sandy (18L) Damage Report; Remnants Still Visible Over Eastern USA – November 1st, 2012

39.2N 80.2W

November 1st, 2012 Category: Image of the day, Tropical Cyclones

Hurricane Sandy (18L) – October 31st, 2012

The remnants of Hurricane Sandy (18L) can be observed over the USA in this image, stretching from the south to the northeast to the midwest. Many states were impacted by the storms.

High winds and waves washed sand onto coastal roads in southeastern Florida. The storm left power outages across the region. North Carolina was spared from major damage through the late evening hours of October 28, though winds, rain, and inland snow could affect the state through October 30. Several highways were flooded, and a state of emergency was declared in 24 western counties due to snow and strong winds.

On October 29, snow was falling in parts of the state of Virginia. Virginia was awarded a federal disaster declaration. At Sandy’s peak, 200,000 customers were without power, and in Northern Virginia where most of the outages occurred 92,000 customers were still without power on 30 October; the local utility intended to restore full service by 1 November.

West Virginia was also declared a federal disaster area, due to abnormally heavy snowfall. In Kentucky, the most impacted area was the Eastern region of the state where as much as eight inches of snow fell as Sandy merged with a cold front.

In Maryland, at least 100 feet of a fishing pier at the beach resort of Ocean City was destroyed. Several bridges were closed, and I-68 in far western Maryland and northern West Virginia closed due to impassable roads from heavy snow. Multiple vehicles are stranded on the interstate and the National Guard was sent out to help. Workers in Howard County, Maryland tried to stop a sewage overflow caused by a power outage October 30. Raw sewage spilled at a rate of 2 million gallons per hour. It was unclear how much sewage had flowed into the Little Patuxent River.

In Delaware, which was also declared a federal disaster area, rainfall at Rehoboth Beach totaled 6.53 inches inches by early afternoon, with nearly 7 inches at Indian River Inlet and more than 4 inches in Dover and Bear. At 4 p.m., Delmarva Power reported on its website that more than 13,900 customers in Delaware and Maryland’s Eastern Shore had lost electric service as high winds brought down trees and power lines. Delaware Route 1 is now closed by flooding from Dewey Beach to Fenwick Island.

In New Jersey, a 50-foot piece of the Atlantic City Boardwalk washed away. Half the city of Hoboken is flooded. In the early morning of October 30, authorities in Bergen County, New Jersey, are evacuating residents after a berm overflowed and flooded several communities. Police Chief of Staff Jeanne Baratta says there are up to 5 feet of water in the streets of Moonachie and Little Ferry.

In Pennsylvania, several bridges and highways were closed, and more than 1.2 million were left without power as a result of the storm. Storm impacts in Upstate New York were much more limited than in New York City; there was some flooding and a few downed trees. Large portions of the Manhattan borough of New York City were without electricity. The East River over flowed its banks, flooding large sections of Lower Manhattan. Battery Park had a water surge of 13.88 ft. Seven subway tunnels under the East River were flooded as of October 30. Sea water flooded the Ground Zero construction site.

Over 385,000 customers in Massachusetts were without power as of the afternoon of October 29, and flooding of roadways and buildings was reported. In New Hampshire, over 200,000 customers were without power as of late Monday, October 29. In Rhode Island, over 100,000 customers lost power during the storm. In Ohio, on October 30, at least 247,000 in northeast Ohio were without power, mostly in the Cleveland area. In Michigan, more than 120,000 customers were without power at one point, but as of 9 p.m. Tuesday, only 45,000 are still without power. The National Weather Service said that waves up to 23 feet high were reported on southern Lake Huron.

Massive Blizzard Dumps Snow Over Eastern USA

38.8N 77W

December 22nd, 2009 Category: Snapshots

USA - December 20th, 2009

USA - December 20th, 2009

A massive winter storm that dumped record amounts of snow in the east of the US is now slowly making its way toward the north-east, still shutting airports and closing roads. In Washington DC and New York airports have reopened and roads are being cleared, but authorities report it will be days before things return to normal.

The storm, which began with severe flooding and a tornado in Florida, has covered Washington DC, Philadelphia and New York with a blanket of snow smashing a 70-year-old records. The 33 centimetres of snow that fell in Washington, D.C., by late afternoon was the most ever recorded for a day in December.

The blizzard rocked the Mid-Atlantic and Northeast United States on Saturday, crippling travel across the region and causing hundreds of thousands of power outages. Five deaths appeared to have been caused by the storm system, which stretched from the Carolinas north to New England and spread into some Midwestern states.

Here, snow can be seen covering parts of New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, Washington D.C., Virginia, West Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee and Kentucky.

Forecasters said the storm system was expected to generate winds up to 55 km/h, which could cause near-whiteout conditions. Authorities in many areas asked drivers to stay off the roads if possible. The storm system, coming from the Gulf of Mexico and spreading out across much of the Atlantic coastline, was forecast to bring a mix of snow and freezing rain to North Carolina, Tennessee and parts of western and central Virginia.

Land Between the Lakes, in Kentucky and Tennessee, USA

37.0N 83.8W

November 24th, 2009 Category: Lakes, Rivers

USA - November 8th, 2009

USA - November 8th, 2009

While the Mississippi River winds its way down the left side of this image, a pair of other distinctive bodies of water is visible to the right. These are Kentucky Lake (left) and Lake Barkley (right). The brown land between them is part of the Land Between the Lakes National Recreation Area, in the US states of Kentucky and Tennessee.

The Tennessee and Cumberland Rivers flow very close to each other in the northwestern corner of Middle Tennessee and Western Kentucky, separated by a rather narrow and mostly low ridge.

This area where they are only a few miles apart had been known as “Between the Rivers” since at least the 1830s or 1840s. After the Cumberland River was impounded in the 1960s and a canal was constructed between the two lakes, Land Between the Lakes became the largest inland peninsula in the United States.

Downstream from this area, the courses of the rivers then diverge again, with the result being that the mouth of the Cumberland into the Ohio River is approximately 40 mi (64 km) from that of the Tennessee.

Ridges, Valleys and a Wildfire in the Area of Knoxville, Tennessee, USA

35.9N 83.9W

November 13th, 2009 Category: Fires, Lakes, Rivers

USA - November 8th, 2009

USA - November 8th, 2009

The city of Knoxville in the state of Tennessee, USA, is visible as a greyish circular area in the lower left quadrant, near a series of hills and ridges. These are part of the Appalachian Ridge-and-Valley Province, which consists of a series of elongate and narrow ridges that traverse the upper Tennessee Valley.

Also of note in this image is a wildfire in the upper left quadrant, the smoke from which is blowing northeast. The fire is located in the state of Kentucky, not far from the Tennessee border.

The most substantial Ridge-and-Valley structures in the Knoxville area are Bays Mountain, which runs along the Knox-Blount county line to the south, and Beaver Ridge, which passes through the northern section of the town. The Great Smoky Mountains— a subrange of the Appalachian Mountains— are located approximately 20 miles (32 km) south of Knoxville.

In the southeast part of the city, the French Broad River joins the Holston River to form the Tennessee River. Knoxville is centered around a hilly area along the north bank of the river between its First Creek and Second Creek tributaries.

Two lakes are visible northeast of Knoxville. The first, Douglas Lake, also called Douglas Reservoir, is an artificial lake created by an impoundment of the French Broad River by Douglas Dam. The dam was built by the Tennessee Valley Authority in the early 1940s to control flooding in the Tennessee Valley and provide electricity to rural areas in the region. The lake, easily identified by it’s snakelike bends, is situated only a few miles from the Pigeon Forge/Gatlinburg area and the Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

The second body of water, just north of Douglas Lake, is the Cherokee Reservoir, also known as Cherokee Lake, formed by the impoundment of the Holston River behind Cherokee Dam, which was built for hydroelectric generation and flood control. The reservoir has a surface area of about 28,780 acres (11,650 ha), a flood-storage capacity of 749,406 acre feet (924,379,000 m3), and nearly 400 miles (640 km) of shoreline. In a normal year, the lake water level fluctuates over a range of about 27 feet (8.2 m).

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