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Posts tagged Kanin Peninsula

Bays and Rivermouths Along Northwestern Coast of Russia – September 29th, 2009

68.0N 45.0E

September 29th, 2009 Category: Image of the day, Rivers

Russia - July 28th, 2009

Russia - July 28th, 2009

Bays by Kanin Peninsula

Bays by Kanin Peninsula

Several rivermouths and bays mark the shoreline of this area of northwestern Russia.

The land features visible include the edge of the Kola Peninsula (lower left corner), part of the Murmansk Oblast, the Kanin Peninsula (east of the former) in Nenets Autonomous Okrug, and the hooked southern tip of Mezhdusharskiy Island (top center) of the Novaya Zemlya archipelago.

Between the Kola and Kanin Peninsulas, the Mezen River empties tan sediments into Mezen Bay, with an area of 6,630 km², part of the White Sea (see close-up for more detailed view).

On the eastern side of the Kanin Peninsula, some sediments also frame the coast of Chesha Bay (Chiosha Bay), an inlet of the Barents Sea. The bay is 84 miles (135 km) wide and 62 miles (100 km) long (see close-up).

Continuing eastward along the coast, the Pechora River spills darker brown sediments into the Pechora Sea. This 1,809 km long river runs from the Ural Mountains to Nosovaya at the shores of the sea.

Intense Phytoplankton Bloom in Barents Sea

69.6N 37.7E

August 19th, 2009 Category: Snapshots

Phytoplankton bloom in Barents Sea - August 19th, 2009

Phytoplankton bloom in Barents Sea - August 19th, 2009

Close-up of phytoplankton swirls in the Barents Sea - August 19th, 2009

Close-up of phytoplankton swirls in the Barents Sea - August 19th, 2009

Phytoplankton off coast by Norway-Russia border - August 18th, 2009

Phytoplankton off coast by Norway-Russia border - August 18th, 2009

A huge, intense bloom  of bright green and blue phytoplankton is flourishing in the Barents Sea, part of the Arctic Ocean, off the northern coasts of Russia and Norway.

In the main image, the bloom is most intense in the waters above the Kola Peninsula (lower left), stretching northward, but does not reach all the way eastward to the Kanin Peninsula and Kolguyev Island (right).

The first complementary image provides a closer look at the swirled patterns of the bloom on August 19th, while the second focuses on the bloom one day earlier and further west, near the border of Norway and Russia.

Cloud Vortex over Barents Sea

April 12th, 2009 Category: Snapshots

Cloud vortex north of Russia - April 9th, 2009

Cloud vortex north of Russia - April 9th, 2009

Clouds begin to take on a spiralled pattern, forming a vortex over the Barents Sea, off the northern coast of Russia. Below the vortex, Kolguyev Island, Kanin Peninsula and Kola Peninsula are visible (from top to bottom on the right).

The White Sea is located between the Kola Peninsula and the Russian mainland. It is connected to the Barents Sea by Mezen Bay, between the two peninsulas. Ice on the mainland side of these bodies of water is gradually melting away, while the shoreline of the Kola Peninsula is ice-free.

The Circular Kolguyev Island, Russia

April 6th, 2009 Category: Snapshots

Russia - April 5th, 2009

Russia - April 5th, 2009

Russia’s round Kolguyev Island stands out amids the clouds and melting ice in the south-eastern Barents Sea, to the north-east of the Kanin Peninsula (left) and south of the Novaya Zemlya Archipelago (top center).

The approximately circular-shaped island has a diameter of 80 km and is 4968 km2 in area. The highest point on the island is at 50 m.

The vast wetland consists of many bogs and morainic hills, covered by vegetation characteristic of the tundra. There is only one inhabited settlement on the island, Bugrino, located on the southeast coast.

Clouds and Ice off Russian Coast, Arctic Ocean

March 27th, 2009 Category: Snapshots

Russia - March 12th, 2009

Russia - March 12th, 2009

Close-up

Close-up

Clouds make linear patterns (see close-up) over the icy waters of the Arctic Ocean, off the coast of Russia.

The land visible at the bottom left is part of the Kola Peninsula in the Murmansk Oblast. The Russian mainland lies to the right, with the Kanin Peninsula jutting out just east of the Kola Peninsula.

The other landmasses visible are islands, seemingly connected to the continent by ice. Kolguyev Island is located in the south-eastern Barents Sea, to the north-east of the Kanin Peninsula.

The white, hooked strip of land coming down from the top center is actually two islands: Severny and Yuzhny, in the the Novaya Zemlya archipelago.

Yuzhny, the southern island, is separated from Vaygach Island by the Kara Strait. This 56 km strait connects the Kara Sea and the Barents Sea.

In turn, Vaygach Island is separated from mainland Russia’s Yugorsky Peninsula by the Yugorsky Strait.

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