Earth Snapshot RSS Feed Twitter
 
 
 
 

Posts tagged Kalahari Basin

White and Green Surface of Etosha Pan, Namibia – December 30th, 2011

18.7S 16.4E

December 30th, 2011 Category: Image of the day, Salt Flats

Namibia - December 24th, 2011

The Etosha pan is a large endorheic salt pan, forming part of the Kalahari Basin in the north of Namibia. The 120-kilometre-long (75-mile-long) dry lakebed and its surroundings are protected as Etosha National Park, one of Namibia’s largest wildlife parks.

The pan is mostly dry but after a heavy rain it will acquire a thin layer of water, which is heavily salted by the mineral deposits on the surface of the pan. Therefore, most of the year the pan is dry mud coated with salt. Here, the salt coating gives it a whitish color.

Plant Growth on the Etosha Pan, Namibia – June 9th, 2011

18.7S 16.4E

June 9th, 2011 Category: Image of the day, Salt Flats

Namibia - May 23rd, 2011

The Etosha National Park covers an area of 22 270 square km in Namibia. It is home to 114 mammal species, 340 bird species, 110 reptile species, 16 amphibian species and, perhaps surprisingly, one species of fish.

 

Etosha, meaning “Great White Place”, is dominated by a massive mineral pan. The pan is part of the Kalahari Basin, the floor of which was formed around 1000 million years ago. The Etosha Pan covers around 25% of the National Park.

The pan was originally a lake fed by the Kunene River. However the course of the river changed thousands of years ago and the lake dried up. The pan now is a large dusty depression of salt and dusty clay which fills only if the rains are heavy and even then only holds water for a short time. Here, the green swirls around the edges of the pan indicate the presence of water and algae.

This temporary water in the Etosha Pan attracts thousands of wading birds including impressive flocks of flamingos. The perennial springs along the edges of the Etosha Pan draw large concentrations of wildlife and birds.

 

Africa, from Floodplain Wetlands to Dry Salt Flats

20.4S 22.7E

May 30th, 2009 Category: Lakes, Rivers

Angola, Botswana, Zambia and Namibia - May 13th, 2009

Angola, Botswana, Zambia and Namibia - May 13th, 2009

The wet, interior highland of Angola (upper left quadrant) gradually changes into dry savanna in the interior south and southeast of the country (center left). In the south-east, the rivers belong either to the Zambezi system, or, like the Okavango, drain to Lake Ngami.

Lake Ngami can be observed at the bottom right, just below the Okavango Delta in Botswana.

Visible here as a thick green line north of the Okavango Delta is the Cuando River (alternatively spelled Kwando). This dark green band also marks the border between Angola and Zambia.

The Cuando, which flows into the Zambezi River,  has a wide floodplain.  As with all rivers in south-central Africa its flow varies enormously between the rainy season when it floods and may be several kilometres wide, and the dry season when it may disappear into marshes.

Another river, recognizable as a lighter green line, is visible north of the Cuando. This is the Zambezi River, and the wide green band is an area of wetlands in its Barotse Floodplain, at the end of the rainy season.

Moving southwest to a drier region in the bottom left corner of the image, the Etosha Pan stands out as a white and green area. It is a large endorheic salt pan, forming part of the Kalahari Basin in the north of Namibia. The 120-kilometre-long (75-mile-long) dry lakebed and its surroundings are protected as Etosha National Park, one of Namibia’s largest wildlife parks.

About Us

Earth Observation

Organisations

Archive

November 2019
M T W T F S S
« Mar    
 123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
252627282930  

Categories


Bulletin Board


Featured Posts

Information

46


Take Action

Widgets