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Posts tagged Kalahari Basin

Climate Change Issues for Etosha Pan, Namibia

18.7S 16.4E

April 20th, 2013 Category: Climate Change, Salt Flats

Namibia – April 20th, 2013

The Etosha pan is a large 20-kilometre-long (75-mile-long) endorheic salt pan forming part of the Kalahari Basin in the north of Namibia. The pan is protected due to its designated as a Ramsar wetland of international importance; however, temperatures in Namibia have been rising at three times the global average rate for the twentieth century, and scientists expect the climate to continue to become hotter and drier—which could reduce the range and number of wildlife supported by Etosha. If nothing is done to reduce heat-trapping emissions, the pan faces a net loss of around eight species of mammals by 2050.

Etosha Pan and Phytoplankton Near Namibia Coast

18.7S 16.4E

December 6th, 2012 Category: Phytoplankton, Salt Flats

Namibia – December 3rd, 2012

Visible by the right edge of this image is the Etosha Pan, a large endorheic salt pan, forming part of the Kalahari Basin in the north of Namibia. The 120-kilometre-long (75-mile-long) lakebed is mostly dry mud coated with salt, as can be observed from its white color here, but after a heavy rain it will acquire a thin layer of water.

Moving westward, a faint phytoplankton bloom can be seen off the coast of Namibia, in the waters of the Pacific Ocean. The bloom appears more blue in color in the left left corner, and more green to the northeast, closer to the shore.

Fires East of Etosha Pan in Namibia

19.1S 18.9E

August 23rd, 2012 Category: Fires

Namibia – August 18th, 2012

Several individual fires can be seen in Namibia through the general veil of smoke that covers much of the image. The plumes of smoke from the blazes are blowing in a southwesterly direction. Those near the center of the image are fanning out over a greater area than those in the upper right quadrant. Visible by the left edge is the Etosha Pan, a large endorheic salt pan in the Kalahari Basin in northern Namibia.

Green and White Surface of Etosha Pan, Namibia

18.7S 16.4E

April 28th, 2012 Category: Salt Flats

Namibia - April 15th, 2012

The Etosha pan is a large endorheic salt pan, forming part of the Kalahari Basin in the north of Namibia. The 120-kilometre-long (75-mile-long) dry lakebed and its surroundings are protected as Etosha National Park, one of Namibia’s largest wildlife parks. The area exhibits a characteristic white and greenish surface, which spreads over hundreds of kilometres.

The pan is mostly dry but after a heavy rain it will acquire a thin layer of water, which is heavily salted by the mineral deposits on the surface of the pan, which most of the year is dry mud coated with salt that splits into hexagonal shapes as it dries and cracks. Today it is seldom seen with even a thin sheet of water covering it.

Etosha Pan and Phytoplankton Bloom Near Namib Desert, Namibia

18.7S 16.4E

April 3rd, 2012 Category: Deserts, Phytoplankton, Salt Flats

Namibia - March 18th, 2012

Several interesting features of Namibia can be observed in this image: the Etosha Pan (above, center) and the Namib Desert (along the coast). The Etosha Pan is a large endorheic salt pan, forming part of the Kalahari Basin in the north of Namibia. The pan is mostly dry but after a heavy rain it will acquire a thin layer of water, which is heavily salted by the mineral deposits on its surface.

The Namib desert shows a contrast between the gravelly northern half and the sandy southern half, characterized by tall, orange-red sand dunes. Visible offshore is a faint phytoplankton bloom, common in the area due to the mixing of warm and cold ocean currents.

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