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Posts tagged Jutland Peninsula

Contrails Over Jutland Peninsula, Denmark and Germany

57.0N 8.8E

June 5th, 2013 Category: Climate Change, Clouds MODISTerra

Denmark – June 4th, 2013

Condensation trails create criss-crossed lines over the Jutland Peninsula (center), the northern part of which belongs to Denmark and the southern part of which belongs to Germany. Depending on the temperature and humidity at the altitude the contrail forms, they may be visible for only a few seconds or minutes, or may persist for hours and spread to be several miles wide. Persistent spreading contrails are thought to have a significant effect on global climate.

Contrails, by affecting the Earth’s radiation balance, act as a radiative forcing. Studies have found that contrails trap outgoing longwave radiation emitted by the Earth and atmosphere (positive radiative forcing) at a greater rate than they reflect incoming solar radiation (negative radiative forcing).

Global radiative forcing has been calculated from the reanalysis data, climatological models and radiative transfer codes. It is estimated to amount to 0.012 W/m2 for 2005, with an uncertainty range of 0.005 to 0.0026 W/m2, and with a low level of scientific understanding. Therefore, the overall net effect of contrails is positive, i.e. a warming effect.

However, the effect varies daily and annually, and overall the magnitude of the forcing is not well known: globally (for 1992 air traffic conditions), values range from 3.5 mW/m2 to 17 mW/m2. Other studies have determined that night flights are mostly responsible for the warming effect: while accounting for only 25% of daily air traffic, they contribute 60 to 80% of contrail radiative forcing. Similarly, winter flights account for only 22% of annual air traffic, but contribute half of the annual mean radiative forcing.

Climate Change and the Danish Coastline – April 21st, 2013

56.0N 10.0E

April 21st, 2013 Category: Climate Change, Image of the day

Denmark- April 20th, 2013

The Danish coastline measures 4605 km, bordering the Baltic Sea in the east and the North Sea in the west. Along the western coast, the country consists of a large peninsula, Jutland. Denmark is known for its many islands as Zealand and Lolland as well as its hundreds of minor islands often referred to as the Danish Archipelago.

The main climate change risks for the coastal zones of Denmark are likely to come from increased rainfall and flash storms. Also, the loss of eco-systems or wetlands due to climate change deserves attention.

The main populated areas of Denmark vulnerable to coastal flooding and erosion are the municipalities of Lolland and Greve situated along the Baltic Sea as well as the west coast of Jutland which is exposed to the North Sea.

Salt marshes and dunes are commonly found along the Danish coastline, especially along the west coast of Jutland. The areas constitute important natural habitats for a large number of plant and animal species (click here for more information).

Sediments and Phytoplankton Off Coast of Denmark

56.6N 8.5E

April 1st, 2012 Category: Phytoplankton, Sediments

Denmark - March 31st, 2012

Sediments  can be seen off the coast of Denmark and the Jutland Peninsula. Nearest the shoreline they are greyish brown in color, and become progressively greener as they diffuse into the North Sea. Further west, the greenish blue color of the water appears to be due to phytoplankton rather than coloring by sediments, although the presence of sediments in the water often brings increased nutrients which, in turn, lead to increased phytoplankton growth.

Hamburg and Jutland Peninsula, Germany and Denmark – February 13th, 2012

53.5N 9.9E

February 13th, 2012 Category: Image of the day

Denmark - February 10th, 2012

This wide-swath ASAR image shows the Jutland Peninsula, a peninsula in Europe, divided between Denmark and Germany. The Danish portion has an area of 29,775 km2 (11,496 sq mi) and a population of 2,513,601 (2007). Population density is 84 per km² (218 per sq.mi.). Its terrain is relatively flat, with heaths, plains and peat bogs in the west and a more elevated and slightly hilly terrain in the east.

The northernmost part of Jutland is separated by the Limfjord from the mainland, but is still commonly considered as part of the peninsula. It only became an island following a flood in 1825. The Danish Wadden Sea Islands and the German North Frisian Islands stretch along the southwest coast of Jutland in the German Bight.

Visible at the center of the bottom edge is Hamburg, located on the southern point of the Jutland Peninsula, directly between Continental Europe to its south, Scandinavia to its north, the North Sea to its west, and the Baltic Sea to its east. It is the second-largest city in Germany and the seventh-largest city in the European Union. The city is home to over 1.8 million people, while the Hamburg Metropolitan Region has more than 4.3 million inhabitants. Situated on the river Elbe, the port of Hamburg is the third-largest port in Europe (after the Port of Rotterdam and the Port of Antwerp) and it is among the twenty largest in the world.

Large Sound of the Limfjord, in Northern Denmark – December 1st, 2011

56.7N 8.8E

December 1st, 2011 Category: Image of the day

Denmark - November 23rd, 2011

This orthorectified image shows the Limfjord, a shallow sound in Denmark that separates the island of Vendsyssel-Thy from the rest of the Jutland Peninsula. It extends from Thyborøn Channel on the North Sea to Hals on the Kattegat.

The sound is approximately 180 kilometres long and of an irregular shape with several bays, narrowings, and islands, most notably Mors (left). It is deepest at Hvalpsund (24 metres). Its main port is Aalborg, visible as a bright white area at the right edge of the image.

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