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Jakarta and Mount Gede Volcano, Indonesia

6.2S 106.8E

January 19th, 2012 Category: Volcanoes

Indonesia - January 4th, 2012

In the upper right corner of this APM image is Jakarta, the capital and largest city of Indonesia. It is located on the northwest coast of Java, at the mouth of the Ciliwung River on Jakarta Bay, which is an inlet of the Java Sea. The city has an area of 661 square kilometres (255 sq mi).

Jakarta lies in a low, flat basin, averaging 7 metres (23 ft) above sea level; 40% of Jakarta, particularly the northern areas, is below sea level, while the southern parts are comparatively hilly. Rivers flow from the Puncak highlands to the south of the city, across the city northwards towards the Java Sea; the most important is the Ciliwung River, which divides the city into the western and eastern principalities. Other rivers include the Pesanggrahan, and Sunter.

Visible to the south, near the right edge, in the full image, is Mount Gede or Gunung Gede, a stratovolcano in West Java, Indonesia. The volcano contains two peaks: Mount Gede and Mount Pangrango. Seven craters are located in the complex: Baru, Gumuruh (2,927 m), Lanang (2,800 m), Kawah Leutik, Ratu (2,800 m), Sela (2,709 m) and Wadon (2,600 m). Historical volcanic activity has been recorded since the 16th century.

Volcanoes on Indonesian Island Chain

8.6S 116.3E

January 4th, 2012 Category: Volcanoes

Indonesia - December 22nd, 2011

This orthorectified wide-swath ASAR image shows several islands in Indonesia: (from left to right) Java, Bali, Lombok and Sumbawa. Also visible at the top are Madura (left) and Saubi (center).

Many volcanic peaks can be seen on the islands. One of the most prominent is Mount Rinjani, on Lombok. This active volcano on Lombok rises to 3726 m, making it the second highest volcano in Indonesia. On the top of the volcano is a 6 km by 8.5 km caldera, partially filled by Segara Anak (Child of the Sea) lake. This lake is approximately 2000 metres above sea level and estimated at 200 metres deep.

 

Iyang-Argapura and Ijen Volcano Complexes, Java, Indonesia – December 17th, 2011

7.9S 113.5E

December 17th, 2011 Category: Image of the day, Volcanoes

Indonesia - December 11th, 2011

This orthorectified wide-swath ASAR image shows several volcanoes on the island of Java, Indonesia. Visible near the center of the island is Iyang-Argapura, a massive volcanic complex that dominates the landscape between Mount Raung and Mount Lamongan. Valleys up to 1,000 m deep dissect the strongly eroded Iyang volcano.

Visible on the east end of the island is the Ijen volcano complex, a group of stratovolcanoes. It is inside a larger caldera Ijen, which is about 20 kilometers wide. The Gunung Merapi stratovolcano is the highest point of that complex. West of Gunung Merapi is the Ijen volcano, which has a one-kilometer-wide acid crater lake.

Many other post-caldera cones and craters are located within the caldera or along its rim. The largest concentration of post-caldera cones forms an east/west-trending zone across the southern side of the caldera. The active crater at Kawah Ijen has an equivalent radius of 361 metres (1,184 ft), a surface of 0.41 square kilometres (0.16 sq mi). It is 200 metres (660 ft) deep and has a volume of 36 cubic hectometres (29,000 acre·ft).

Mount Rinjani and Ripples Between Indonesian Islands – December 16th, 2011

8.4S 116.4E

December 16th, 2011 Category: Image of the day, Volcanoes

Indonesia - December 11th, 2011

This orthorectified wide-swath ASAR image focuses on Bali, an Indonesian island located in the westernmost end of the Lesser Sunda Islands, lying between Java to the west (left edge) and Lombok to the east (right edge).

Of particular note on the islands are many volcanic peaks. One of the most prominent is Mount Rinjani, an active volcano on Lombok. It rises to 3726 m, making it the second highest volcano in Indonesia. On the top of the volcano is a 6 km by 8.5 km caldera, which is filled partially by the crater lake known as Segara Anak (Child of the Sea). This lake is approximately 2000 metres above sea level and estimated at 200 metres deep.

Visible at the top edge in the upper right quadrant is Saubi, one of the islands of the Kangean Archipelago. Administratively, the island is located in East Java, Indonesia. Multiple parallel rows of semicircular ripples can be seen spreading northwards from Bali and Lombok towards Saubi.

Semarang and Numerous Stratovolcanoes in Java, Indonesia – November 17th, 2011

6.9S 110.4E

November 17th, 2011 Category: Image of the day, Volcanoes

Indonesia - November 8th, 2011

This APM image shows the city of Semarang, located on the northern coast of Java, Indonesia. It is the capital of the province of Central Java. It has an area of 305.17 km² and a population of approximately 1.5 million people, making it Indonesia’s 9th most populous city. The northern part of the city is built on the coastal plain while the southern parts are on higher ground.

Visible in the lower half of the image are a series of volcanic peaks. In a curved line due south of the city are four stratovolcanoes (from north to south): the deeply eroded Mount Ungaran, Mount Telomoyo, the dormant Mount Merbabu and the active Mount Merapi. In the lower left quadrant are Mount Sundoro (left) and Mount Sumbing (right), both of which are active stratovolcanoes.

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