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Posts tagged Jamuna River

Brahmaputra River Flowing Down From Himalayas Towards Bay of Bengal

23.7N 92.7E

November 22nd, 2011 Category: Sediments

India, Myanmar and Bangladesh - November 8th, 2011

Flowing down from the Himalayas and diagonally across the upper part of this image of India, Bangladesh and Myanmar is the Brahmaputra River. From its origin in southwestern Tibet as the Yarlung Tsangpo River, it flows across southern Tibet to break through the Himalayas in great gorges and into Arunachal Pradesh (India) where it is known as Dihang.

It then flows southwest through the Assam Valley as Brahmaputra and south through Bangladesh as the Jamuna (not to be mistaken with Yamuna of India). In the vast Ganges Delta it merges with the Padma, the main distributary of the Ganges, then the Meghna, before emptying into the Bay of Bengal. Here, sediments from the delta can be seen giving part of the bay an opaque tan color.

 

Confluence of Padma and Jamuna Rivers, Bangladesh

23.7N 89.7E

November 20th, 2011 Category: Rivers

Bangladesh - November 9th, 2011

This APM image shows the confluence of the Padma River (left) and Jamuna River (above), in Bangladesh. The Jamuna is one of the country’s three main rivers. The Brahmaputra-Jamuna is a classic example of a braided river and is highly susceptible to channel migration and avulsion.

The Jamuna is the main distributary channel of the Brahmaputra River as it flows out of India into Bangladesh. The Jamuna then flows south and joins the Padma River (Pôdda) near Goalundo Ghat. Merged with the Padma (Pôdda), it meets the Meghna River near Chandpur. Its waters then flow into the Bay of Bengal as the Meghna River.

 

Sediments in Ganges Delta and Gulf of Martaban, Bangladesh and Myanmar – November 11th, 2011

20.0N 93.4E

November 11th, 2011 Category: Image of the day, Rivers, Sediments

Myanmar and Bangladesh - November 8th, 2011

Two large, sediment filled bays can be seen in this image of Bangladesh (left) and Myanmar (right). Visible in southern Myanmar is the Gulf of Martaban, filled with sediments by the Salween Sittaung and Yangon Rivers. Visible in Bangladesh is the Ganges Delta, where sediments enter into the Bay of Bengal.

The Ganges Delta (also known as the Ganges–Brahmaputra Delta, the Sunderbans Delta, or the Bengalla Delta) is a river delta in Bangladesh and the state of West Bengal, India. It is the world’s largest delta, approximately 350 km (220 mi) across at the Bay of Bengal.

A number of large rivers flow through the Ganges Delta, including the Padma (main distributary of the Ganges) and the Jamuna (main distributary of the Brahmaputra), which merge and then join the Meghna before entering the sea.

Braided Channels of Jamuna River, Bangladesh – July 19th, 2011

23.4N 90.0E

July 19th, 2011 Category: Image of the day, Rivers

Bangladesh - July 12th, 2011

This APM image shows the Jamuna River, one of the three main rivers of Bangladesh. It is the main distributary channel of the Brahmaputra River as it it flows out of India into Bangladesh.

The Jamuna flows south and joins the Padma River (Pôdda) near Goalundo Ghat. Merged with the Padma (Pôdda), it meets the Meghna River near Chandpur. Its waters then flow into the Bay of Bengal as the Meghna River.

The Brahmaputra-Jamuna is a classic example of a braided river and is highly susceptible to channel migration and avulsion. Its braided channels with numerous sandbars enclosed among them can be observed in great detail in the full image.

Thick Smoke Over Bangladesh and Northeastern India – January 1st, 2011

23.7N 90.4E

January 1st, 2011 Category: Fires, Image of the day, Rivers

India and Bangladesh - December 27th, 2010

Thick smoke hovers over northeastern India and Bangladesh, veiling the course of the Brahmaputra/Jamuna River. The smoke billows out over the rivermouths along the Bangladeshi coastline and over the Bay of Bengal.

The high Himalayas (top edge) prevent the smoke from spreading northward into Bhutan and Tibet. While such smoke over India and Bangladesh is often caused by agricultural fires, it is worth noting that several severe factory and warehouse fires occurred in Bangladesh in mid to late December.

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