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Posts tagged Iwo To

Typhoon Nida (26W) Moves Slightly Northwestward

23.6N 134.2E

December 2nd, 2009 Category: Tropical Cyclones

Typhoon Nida (26W) - December 1st, 2009

Typhoon Nida (26W) - December 1st, 2009

Track of TY 26W - December 1st, 2009 © Univ. of Wisconsin

Track of TY 26W

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Typhoon Nida (TY 26W), located approximately 315 nautical miles southwest of Iwo To, has tracked north-northwestward at 7 knots over the last six hours. A finger of the mid-level subtropical ridge located to the east has continued to steer the system westward. Maximum significant wave height is 26 feet.

Animated infrared satellite imagery shows weakening convection with an embedded center while animated water vapor imagery and an SSMIS micrwoave image indicate the deep convection has shifted somewhat to the east of the low level circulation center (LLCC), suggesting the system has moved into an environment of moderate vertical wind shear. Accordingly, Dvorak estimates have dropped to 55-65 knots.

Nida is still expected to continue tracking generally northwestward before recurving ahead of a quickly approaching mid-latitude trough currently digging north of China. Over the next two days the system will continue to weaken due to increasing vertical wind shear and dry air entrainment. By TAU 48 Nida will complete transition into a very weak extratropical cyclone and its energy will continue tracking northeastward into the mid-latitudes.

Typhoon Nida (26W) Still Churning South-Southwest of Iwo To

21.7N 129.3E

December 1st, 2009 Category: Tropical Cyclones

Typhoon Nida (26W) - November 28th, 2009

Typhoon Nida (26W) - November 30th, 2009

Track of TY 26W - November 30th, 2009 © Univ. of Wisconsin

Track of TY 26W

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Typhoon Nida (TY 26w), located approximately 325 nautical miles south-southwest of Iwo To, has tracked northwestward at 4 knots over the past six hours. Maximum significant wave height is 34 feet.

The system has maximum sustained winds  of 90 knots, with higher gusts of up to 110 knots. Sixty-four knot winds extend outward for a 50 nautical mile radius from the center of Nida. The radius of 50 knot winds is between 90 and 95 nautical miles, and 34 knot winds reach a 150 nautical miles radius.

Nida (26W) Becomes Category 5 Super Typhoon – November 29th, 2009

20.4N 137.8E

November 29th, 2009 Category: Image of the day, Tropical Cyclones

Typhoon Nida (26W) - November 28th, 2009

Typhoon Nida (26W) - November 28th, 2009

Track of STY 26W - November 28th, 2009 © Univ. of Wisconsin

Track of STY 26W

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Super Typhoon Nida (STY 26w), located approximately 350 nautical miles south-southwest of Iwo To, has tracked north-northeastward at 2 knots over the past six hours. Maximum significant wave height is 34 feet.

Maximum sustained winds are at 140 knots, with stronger gusts of up to 170 knots. Winds of 64 knots extend outward for a radius of 50 to 55 nautical miles from the eye of the storm, while the radius of winds of up to 50 knots is 75 to 80 nautical miles.

Typhoon Choi-Wan (15W) Slows, Expected to Miss Japan

31.7N 140.6E

September 19th, 2009 Category: Tropical Cyclones

Typhoon Choi-Wan - September 19th, 2009

Typhoon Choi-Wan - September 19th, 2009

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Position of TY 15W - September 19th, 2009

Position of TY 15W

Track of Choi-Wan - September 19th, 2009 © Univ. of Wisconsin

Track of Choi-Wan

The maximum sustained winds of Typhoon Choi-Wan (15W) slowed to 140 kilometers per hour from 260 kph earlier this week (click here for previous articles) when it was designated as a Category 5 supertyphoon.

Choi-Wan, located 350 nautical miles south-southeast of Tokyo, Japan, has tracked northeastward at 22 knots over the past six hours. Maximum significant wave height is 32 feet.

The typhoon is forecast to continue weakening as it tracks in a northwesterly direction south of Tokyo tonight and early tomorrow. Choi-Wan is not expected to make landfall in Japan, although it has been causing heavy surf, hurricane-force winds and torrential, flooding rains for Japanese islands such as Iwo To.

Typhoon Choi-Wan (15W) Weakens Slightly but Still Category 5 Storm

September 18th, 2009 Category: Tropical Cyclones

Super Typhoon Choi-Wan - September 18th, 2009

Super Typhoon Choi-Wan - September 18th, 2009

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Position of TY 15W - September 18th, 2009

Position of TY 15W

Track of Choi-Wan - September 18th, 2009 © Univ. of Wisconsin

Track of Choi-Wan

Typhoon Choi-Wan (15W), located approximately 120 nautical miles west-northwest of Iwo-To, Japan, has crested the western edge of the steering subtropical ridge axis and tracked north-northeastward at 11 knots over the past six hours. Maximum significant wave height is 41 feet.

The strongest storm on the planet has weakened a little since the last time it was observed (click here for previous articles). However, it is still a Category 5 Hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson classification scale, which less than 1% off all hurricanes reach.

As of today, winds speeds are down to 135 knots or 156 mph, although gusts are still measured up to 180 mph. Choi-wan is expected to weaken and turn extratropical over colder water in the next three days.

In contrast to the lull in the Atlantic basin, this storm in the Pacific Ocean had peaked with winds of 160 mph, gusting over 190 mph. Hurricane force winds extended 120 miles away from the center eye, while tropical storm force winds extended 280 miles from the center eye. The highly active and intensive storms in the western Pacific along with the relatively lull Atlantic season are common during an El Nino year, reports the Examiner.