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Posts tagged Isle of Man

Offshore Turbines of Robin Rigg Wind Farm in Solway Firth, United Kingdom – November 25th, 2011

November 25th, 2011 Category: Image of the day

United Kingdom - November 8th, 2011

This orthorectified image shows the  Solway Firth, a firth that forms part of the border between England and Scotland, between Cumbria (including the Solway Plain) and Dumfries and Galloway. It stretches from St Bees Head, just south of Whitehaven in Cumbria, to the Mull of Galloway, on the western end of Dumfries and Galloway. The Isle of Man (visible at the lower left of the full image) is also very near to the firth.

The firth comprises part of the Irish Sea. The coastline is characterised by lowland hills and small mountains. It is a mainly rural area with fishing and hill farming (as well as some arable farming) still playing a large part in the local economy.

Visible in the center of the firth are a series of dots arranged in parallel lines (best observed in full image). These are the turbines of the Robin Rigg Wind Farm, Scotland’s first offshore wind farm, which has been constructed in the Firth, on sandbank midway between the Galloway and Cumbrian coasts.

The construction of the windfarm began in 2007, and it was finally completed on 20th April 2010. Sixty Vestas V90-3MW wind turbines have been installed, with an offshore electrical substation. The 180 MW development will provide enough electricity for about 117,000 households.

 

The Isle of Man and the Solway Firth

54.2N 4.5W

May 19th, 2009 Category: Rivers

Isle of Man and Solway Firth, UK - May 11th, 2009

Isle of Man and Solway Firth, UK - May 11th, 2009

The Isle of Man (bottom) is a self-governing Crown dependency, located in the Irish Sea at the geographical centre of the British Isles.  The island is not part of the United Kingdom (nor of the European Union) but foreign relations, defence, and ultimate good-governance of the Isle of Man are the responsibility of the government of the United Kingdom.

Approximately 32 miles (51 km) long and between 8 miles (13 km) and 15 miles (24 km) wide, the island has an area of around 221 square miles (570 km2).

In the Irish Sea northeast of the Isle of Man is the Solway Firth, a firth (large sea bay) that forms part of the border between England and Scotland. The coastline of the Solway Firth is characterised by lowland hills and small mountains.

The firth’s water itself is generally benign with no notable hazards except some large areas of salt and mud flats which often contain dangerous patches of quicksand that move on a regular basis. Here, its upper reaches appear dark brown from mud flats and from sediments flowing into the firth from the River Waver and the River Wampool.

Cloudless View of the United Kingdom and Ireland – December 4th, 2008

December 4th, 2008 Category: Image of the day

The United Kingdom - December 3rd, 2008

The United Kingdom - December 3rd, 2008

Close-up of Northern England and the Isle of Man

Close-up of England-Scotland border and the Isle of Man

Most of the United Kingdom and Ireland can be seen clearly in this virtually cloud-free image, in which only the area around London and the River Thames is covered.

The terrain changes from plains and slight hills in the South to the Grampian Mountains in the Scottish Highlands in the North.

The first close-up highlights the mountainous region around the England-Scotland border. Sediments flow from the River Waver and the River Wampool into Moricambe Bay, an inlet of the Solway Firth in Cumbria, created by the confluence of the two rivers. Offshore, the Isle of Man can be seen in the Irish Sea.

The snow-capped Cumbrian Mountains (England) are visible south of the bay, as are the Southern Uplands (Scotland), north of the bay. There are many lakes near the base of the mountains.

Detail of England-Wales border and the River Severn

Detail of England-Wales border and the River Severn

The second close-up focuses on Western England and Wales. The River Severn is spilling dark brown sediments towards the Celtic Sea, and the cities of Cardiff (Wales) and Bristol (England) can be seen on its northern and southern shores, respectively. Snow covers the peaks of the Brecon Beacons (Bannau Brycheiniog).

Please click here for full resolution image (5MB).

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