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Posts tagged Irrigation

Sediments by Mouth of Shatt al-Arab and Irrigated Fields by Karun River, Iran and Iraq – November 30th, 2012

31.3N 48.6E

November 30th, 2012 Category: Image of the day, Rivers, Sediments

Iraq – November 30th, 2012

This image shows the Shatt al-Arab, a river in Southwest Asia of some 200 km (120 mi) in length, formed by the confluence of the Euphrates and the Tigris in southern Iraq. The southern end of the river constitutes the border between Iraq and Iran down to the mouth of the river as it discharges into the Persian Gulf.

The Karun river, a tributary which joins the waterway from the Iranian side, deposits large amounts of silt into the river; this necessitates continuous dredging to keep it navigable. Here, this silt is clearly visible in the northern reaches of the gulf.

Also of note are rectangular areas of irrigated fields south of the Iranian city of Ahwaz. Ahwaz is built on the banks of the Karun River and is situated in the middle of Khūzestān Province.

Indus River and Irrigation Issues, Pakistan

27.6N 68.3E

April 4th, 2012 Category: Rivers

Pakistan - March 18th, 2012

Pakistan has a vast irrigation network that distributes the water of the Indus River (visible flanked by a wide green valley) and other waterways, comprising three major storage reservoirs, 19 dams, 43 main canals with a conveyance length of 57,000 km, and 89,000 watercourses with a running length of more than 1.65 million km, according to the World Conservation Union. The system feeds more than 15 million hectares of farmland, giving Pakistan the highest ratio of irrigated land to rain-fed land in the world.

However, this extensive irrigation system is also causing environmental problems. In particular there is concern that moving large volumes of water from rivers has often left insufficient flow to meet the needs of downstream ecosystems. Coastal and marine regions, because they lie at the end of rivers, have been impacted most heavily by the removal and redistribution of water further upstream.

Gezira Scheme Between White Nile and Blue Nile Rivers, Sudan

14.6N 32.8E

January 17th, 2012 Category: Rivers

Sudan - December 29th, 2011

Stretching over an area of 3,400 miles² (8,800 km²) between the While Nile (left) and Blue Nile (right) Rivers is the irrigated land of the Gezira Scheme, one of the largest irrigation projects in the world. The confluence of the two rivers at the city of Khartoum can be observed near the top edge.

The Gezira (which means “island”) is particularly suited to irrigation because the soil slopes away from the Blue Nile and water therefore naturally runs through the irrigation canals by gravity. This network of canals and ditches is 2,700 miles (4,300 km) long. Upon opening the full image, many individual fields can be observed.

Khartoum and Gezira Scheme by Nile River in Sudan – January 9th, 2012

15.5N 32.5E

January 9th, 2012 Category: Image of the day, Rivers

Sudan - January 9th, 2012

Situated near the top edge of this orthorectified wide-swath ASAR image is Khartoum, the capital and largest city of Sudan and of Khartoum State. It is located at the confluence of the White Nile flowing north from Lake Victoria, and the Blue Nile flowing west from Ethiopia. The location where the two Niles meet is known as “al-Mogran”.

Visible just southeast of the confluence of the Blue and White Nile Rivers at Khartoum is the Gezira Scheme, one of the largest irrigation projects in the world. It distributes water from the Blue Nile through canals and ditches to tenant farms lying between the the two rivers. The Gezira is particularly suited to irrigation because the soil slopes away from the Blue Nile and water therefore naturally runs through the irrigation canals by gravity.

Al Jabel Al Akhdar and Irrigated Fields East of the Haruj, Libya

27.6N 20.1E

September 20th, 2011 Category: Deserts, Volcanoes

Libya - August 18th, 2011

The brown area along the coastline of Libya is location of the Al Jabel Al Akhdar, meaning the Green Mountain. The range runs parallel to the Mediterranean Sea, east of the Gulf of Sidra. Visible to the north, near the top edge, is the island of Crete.

Moving south, the Haruj volcanic field appears as a large, brown expanse near the bottom edge. In the full image, between two sand dune seas east of the Haruj, some areas of circular, irrigated fields can be seen, arranged in rows.

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