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Hurricane Cosme (03E) Moving Nearer to Baja California

26.2N 120.7W

June 26th, 2013 Category: Tropical Cyclones VIIRSSuomi-NPP

Hurricane Cosme (03E) – June 25th, 2013

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Track of Hurricane Cosme (03E) - June 25th, 2013 © Univ. of Wisconsin

Track of TC 03E

As of 8 p.m. PDT June 25 (0300 UTC June 26), Hurricane Cosme (03E) is located within 15 nautical miles of 17.9°N 113.3°W, about 410 mi (660 km) south-southwest of Cabo San Lucas, Mexico and about 525 mi (845 km) west-southwest of Cabo Corrientes, Mexico.

Maximum sustained winds are 75 kt (85 mph, 140 km/h), with stronger gusts. Minimum central pressure is 981 mbar (hPa; 28.97 InHg), and the system is moving west-northwest at 12 kt (14 mph, 22 km/h). Hurricane-force winds extend outward up to 35 mi (55 km) from the center of Cosme, and tropical storm-force winds extend outward up to 175 mi (280 km) from the center of Cosme.

Hurricane Sandy (18L) Damage Report; Remnants Still Visible Over Eastern USA – November 1st, 2012

39.2N 80.2W

November 1st, 2012 Category: Image of the day, Tropical Cyclones

Hurricane Sandy (18L) – October 31st, 2012

The remnants of Hurricane Sandy (18L) can be observed over the USA in this image, stretching from the south to the northeast to the midwest. Many states were impacted by the storms.

High winds and waves washed sand onto coastal roads in southeastern Florida. The storm left power outages across the region. North Carolina was spared from major damage through the late evening hours of October 28, though winds, rain, and inland snow could affect the state through October 30. Several highways were flooded, and a state of emergency was declared in 24 western counties due to snow and strong winds.

On October 29, snow was falling in parts of the state of Virginia. Virginia was awarded a federal disaster declaration. At Sandy’s peak, 200,000 customers were without power, and in Northern Virginia where most of the outages occurred 92,000 customers were still without power on 30 October; the local utility intended to restore full service by 1 November.

West Virginia was also declared a federal disaster area, due to abnormally heavy snowfall. In Kentucky, the most impacted area was the Eastern region of the state where as much as eight inches of snow fell as Sandy merged with a cold front.

In Maryland, at least 100 feet of a fishing pier at the beach resort of Ocean City was destroyed. Several bridges were closed, and I-68 in far western Maryland and northern West Virginia closed due to impassable roads from heavy snow. Multiple vehicles are stranded on the interstate and the National Guard was sent out to help. Workers in Howard County, Maryland tried to stop a sewage overflow caused by a power outage October 30. Raw sewage spilled at a rate of 2 million gallons per hour. It was unclear how much sewage had flowed into the Little Patuxent River.

In Delaware, which was also declared a federal disaster area, rainfall at Rehoboth Beach totaled 6.53 inches inches by early afternoon, with nearly 7 inches at Indian River Inlet and more than 4 inches in Dover and Bear. At 4 p.m., Delmarva Power reported on its website that more than 13,900 customers in Delaware and Maryland’s Eastern Shore had lost electric service as high winds brought down trees and power lines. Delaware Route 1 is now closed by flooding from Dewey Beach to Fenwick Island.

In New Jersey, a 50-foot piece of the Atlantic City Boardwalk washed away. Half the city of Hoboken is flooded. In the early morning of October 30, authorities in Bergen County, New Jersey, are evacuating residents after a berm overflowed and flooded several communities. Police Chief of Staff Jeanne Baratta says there are up to 5 feet of water in the streets of Moonachie and Little Ferry.

In Pennsylvania, several bridges and highways were closed, and more than 1.2 million were left without power as a result of the storm. Storm impacts in Upstate New York were much more limited than in New York City; there was some flooding and a few downed trees. Large portions of the Manhattan borough of New York City were without electricity. The East River over flowed its banks, flooding large sections of Lower Manhattan. Battery Park had a water surge of 13.88 ft. Seven subway tunnels under the East River were flooded as of October 30. Sea water flooded the Ground Zero construction site.

Over 385,000 customers in Massachusetts were without power as of the afternoon of October 29, and flooding of roadways and buildings was reported. In New Hampshire, over 200,000 customers were without power as of late Monday, October 29. In Rhode Island, over 100,000 customers lost power during the storm. In Ohio, on October 30, at least 247,000 in northeast Ohio were without power, mostly in the Cleveland area. In Michigan, more than 120,000 customers were without power at one point, but as of 9 p.m. Tuesday, only 45,000 are still without power. The National Weather Service said that waves up to 23 feet high were reported on southern Lake Huron.

Post-tropical Cyclone Sandy (18L) Slams East Coast, USA – October 31st, 2012

40.4N 79.9W

October 31st, 2012 Category: Image of the day, Tropical Cyclones

Hurricane Sandy (18L) – October 30th, 2012

As of 11 a.m. EDT (01500 UTC) October 30, Post-tropical Cyclone Sandy (18L) is located near 40.5°N 77.0°W, about 120 miles (190 km) ESE of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and about 145 miles (233 km) west of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Maximum sustained winds are 45 mph (72 km/h), with stronger gusts. Minimum central pressure is 983 mbar (hPa; 29.00 inHg), and the system is moving west at 10 mph (16 km/h).

Hurricane Sandy was the largest Atlantic hurricane in diameter on record, with its winds stretching about 1,100 miles from end to end. About 8 million customers have no electricity spread over 18 states from Maine to Virginia as of midday October 30. About half were in New York and New Jersey. More than 13,000 flights were canceled across the U.S. on October 29, and more than 3,500 were called off October 30. Sandy crippled 25% of wireless cell towers and a quarter of cable services in 10 states. Storm damage was projected at $30 billion to $50 billion, meaning it could prove to be one of the costliest natural disasters in U.S. history. As of October 30, 39 deaths have been reported in the U.S.

Hurricane Sandy (18L) Impacts USA from Virginia to New England – October 30th, 2012

40.2N 75.5W

October 30th, 2012 Category: Image of the day, Tropical Cyclones

Hurricane Sandy (18L) – October 29th, 2012

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Track of Hurricane Sandy (18L) - October 29th, 2012 © Univ. of Wisconsin

Track of TS 18L

As of 11 p.m. EDT October 29 (0300 UTC October 30), Post-tropical Cyclone Sandy (18L) is located within 30 nautical miles of 39.8°N 75.4°W, about 10 mi (15 km) SW of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Maximum sustained winds are 65 knots (75 mph, 120 km/h), with stronger gusts. Minimum central pressure is 952 mbar (hPa; 28.11 InHg), and the system is moving northwest at 16 kt (18 mph, 30 km/h).

Just before 8 a.m. on October 29, Sandy turned to the north-northwest and started to make its expected approach towards the U.S. coast, still maintaining Category 1 strength. Although the National Hurricane Center has not officially confirmed the location, at 5:46 PM local time, Accuweather announced it had come ashore in between Avalon and Sea Isle City in Cape May County, New Jersey. NOAA announced officially that the storm had come ashore at approximately 8:00 p.m. EDT 5 miles southwest of Atlantic City, NJ.

On October 29, 2012, at 7:00 p.m. EDT, Sandy was declared a post-tropical cyclone. Sandy’s impact on the United States stretched from Virginia to New England with tropical storm force winds stretching far inland and significant mountain snows in West Virginia. The cyclone brought a record-breaking storm surge to New York City on the evening of October 29, with numerous streets and tunnels flooded in Lower Manhattan and other areas of the city.

High Destructive Potential of Hurricane Sandy (18L), Eastern USA – October 29th, 2012

34.8N 77W

October 29th, 2012 Category: Image of the day, Tropical Cyclones

Hurricane Sandy (18L) – October 28th, 2012

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Track of Hurricane Sandy (18L) - October 28th, 2012 © Univ. of Wisconsin

Track of TS 18L

As of 5 p.m. EDT (2100 UTC) October 28, Hurricane Sandy is located within 20 nautical miles of 32.4°N 71.3°W, about 270 mi (435 km) east-southeast of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina and about 530 mi (850 km) south-southeast of New York City.

Maximum sustained winds are 65 knots (75 mph, 120 km/h), with stronger gusts. Minimum central pressure is 952 mbar (hPa; 28.11 InHg), and the system is moving northeast at 13 kt (15 mph, 24 km/h). Hurricane force winds extend up to 175 miles (280 km) from the center of Sandy, and tropical storm force winds up to 520 miles (835 km) from the center.

According to the Weather Channel, Hurricane Sandy appears destined to enter the history books as one of the most exceptional and potentially destructive storms to strike the Northeast in modern history.

Sandy, in terms of geographic size, is already the largest Atlantic hurricane of the past quarter-century. In a sign of how extraordinarily large Sandy is, a tropical storm warning is also in effect for Bermuda, while lakeshore flood warnings have been hoisted on parts of the Great Lakes including Chicago. The full extent of the storm is best observed in the full image.

Sandy has stayed close to the borderline between high-end tropical storm and low-end hurricane status, despite an impressively low central pressure. But despite the absence of sustained triple-digit winds, the huge breadth of Sandy’s circulation promises widespread disruption to life for tens of millions of Americans.

Sandy will produce its greatest impacts in the Northeast and the Mid-Atlantic Monday into Tuesday. A huge area of strong winds is blowing water toward the U.S. mainland. Already by Sunday evening, tides in some locations were 2 to 4 feet above normal from the Outer Banks of North Carolina north to eastern Long Island.

Sandy’s rain bands and gusty winds continue to expand across the Northeast. The heaviest rain was focused on the Mid-Atlantic as of late Sunday evening. Winds were gusting in excess of 40 mph in several locations along the Mid-Atlantic and Northeast coastline.

Numerous high wind warnings have been issued across the Northeast for Monday and Tuesday, along with a slew of flood watches and warnings both for storm-surge flooding at the coast and freshwater flooding from rainfall inland. Blizzard warnings have even been posted for the mountains of West Virginia. Tropical storm warnings are in effect for parts of the North Carolina coast. In addition, the National Hurricane Center is forecasting hurricane-force winds from the Maryland/Virginia border to Cape Cod.

Life-threatening storm surge flooding of over 10 feet will be possible in Long Island Sound, and surge up to 6 feet above ground level is expected for parts of coastal North Carolina if peak surge occurs at high tide. Many other East Coast locations can expect dangerous storm surge.

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