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Posts tagged Hotan River

Snow Over Taklamakan Desert, China

37.1N 79.9E

January 24th, 2013 Category: Deserts

China – January 7th, 2013

While deserts are usually associated with an imaginary of scorching temperatures and moistureless terrain, they can actually be quite cold. This image shows snow on the Taklamakan Desert, in northern China, a relatively common occurrence in winter. Visible through the snow are the White Jade (Yurungkash) and Black Jade (Karakash) Rivers, which flow north from the Kunlun Mountains into the desert, later converging to form the Hotan River.

Dust Storm in Northern Taklamakan Desert

39.0N 80.3E

September 6th, 2012 Category: Deserts, Dust Storms, Mountains, Rivers

China – August 31st, 2012

A dust storm lifts sand, dirt and other particles into the air over the Taklamakan Desert, in China. Most of the airborne dust appears concentrated along the northern rim of the Tarim Basin, where it is hemmed in by the tall Tian Shan Mountains. Partially veiled but nonetheless visible through the dust is the Hotan River, which cuts across the desert from south to north.

Kunlun Mountains and Convergence of Karakax and Yurungkax Rivers, China

37.2N 79.8E

December 7th, 2011 Category: Mountains, Rivers

China - November 22nd, 2011

This image shows the southern part of the Taklamakan Desert, bordered by the Kunlun Mountains. Flowing down from the mountains are the Karakax (left) and Yurungkax (right) Rivers, which converge to form the Hotan River (top).

One of the longest mountain chains in Asia, the Kunlun Mountains extend more than 3,000 km. In the broadest sense, the range forms the northern edge of the Tibetan Plateau south of the Tarim Basin and the Gansu Corridor and continues east south of the Wei River to end at the North China Plain. Here, lakes on the Tibetan Plateau can be observed in the lower half of the image.

Khotan River Formed by Confluence White Jade and Black Jade Rivers, China

37.1N 79.9E

May 17th, 2010 Category: Rivers

China - April 28th, 2010

China - April 28th, 2010

Here, the Khotan River can be seen flowing amongst the dunes of the Taklamakan Desert.  It is formed by the confluence of the White Jade (Yurungkash) and Black Jade (Karakash) Rivers, which unite towards the middle of the desert and the center of this ASAR image.

The confluence occurs some 145 kilometres (90 mi) north of the town of Khotan. The Khotan River (also referred to as the Hotan River or Ho-t’ien River) then flows 290 kilometres (180 mi) northwards across the desert and empties itself into the Tarim River.

Khotan River in the Tarim Basin, China

37.1N 79.9E

May 6th, 2010 Category: Rivers

China - April 28th, 2010

China - April 28th, 2010

The Khotan River (also Hotan River or Ho-t’ien River) is formed by the union of the White Jade (Yurungkash) and Black Jade (Karakash) Rivers, which flow north from the Kunlun Mountains into the Taklamakan Desert in northern China. Here, the dunes of the desert can be seen in the lower part of the image.

The two rivers unite towards the middle of the desert, some 145 kilometres (90 mi) north of the town of Khotan. The river then flows 290 kilometres (180 mi) northwards across the desert and empties itself into the Tarim River.

Because the river is fed by melting snow from the mountains, it only carries water during the summer and is dry the rest of the year. The Khotan river bed provides the only transportation system across the Tarim Basin.

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