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Fire Near Gulf of Fonseca, Nicaragua

13.1N 87.6W

February 5th, 2013 Category: Fires

Nicaragua, Honduras, El Salvador – January 23rd, 2013

The Gulf of Fonseca, part of the Pacific Ocean, is a gulf in Central America, bordering El Salvador, Honduras and Nicaragua. The gulf region forms part of the eastern border of El Salvador and is composed of a wide variety of coastal environments, including islands, mangrove forests, sand beaches, and rock cliffs. This environment has been subject to relatively little modification and preserves a rich flora and fauna. The Gulf of Fonseca’s natural resources still support traditional fishing and gathering of molluscs and crustaceans. Here, what appears to be a plume of smoke from a fire can also be seen blowing southwestward off the coast of Nicaragua, southeast of the gulf.

Gulf of Fonseca and Lakes Managua and Nicaragua, Central America

13.2N 87.7W

December 18th, 2012 Category: Lakes

El Salvador, Honduras and Nicaragua – December 16th, 2012

The irregularly shaped bay on the Pacific Coast of Central America is the Gulf of Fonseca, bordering El Salvador, Honduras and Nicaragua. Visible to the southeast is Lake Managua (light green) and Lake Nicaragua (dark green, bottom right corner), both in Nicaragua. West of the gulf, numerous volcanic peaks can be seen, parallel to the coast.

Tropical Storm Ernesto (05L) Over Caribbean Sea

16.6N 80.6W

August 7th, 2012 Category: Tropical Storms

Tropical Storm Ernesto – August 6th, 2012

Enhanced image

Tropical Storm Ernesto - August 6th, 2012 © Univ. of Wisconsin

Tropical Storm Ernesto

As of 8 p.m. EDT August 6 (0000 UTC August 7), Tropical Storm Ernesto is located within 30 nautical miles of 16.5°N 82.1°W, about 295 mi (475 km) east of Isla Roatan, Honduras and about 415 mi (670 km) east of Belize.

Instead of Ernesto becoming more organized, moderate wind shear and dry air made Ernesto more disorganized as it travels through the Caribbean Sea. On August 6, Ernesto slowed from over 20 mph to 10 mph. As it moved over warmer waters and lowered wind shear, Ernesto intensified to near hurricane status.

Currently, maximum sustained winds are 55 knots (65 mph, 100 km/h), with stronger gusts. Minimum central pressure is 995 mbar (hPa; 29.38 InHg), and the system is moving west-northwest at 10 kt (12 mph, 19 km/h). Tropical storm force winds extend outward up to 125 miles (205 km) from the center of Ernesto.

Sediments in Gulf of Fonseca, Central America

13.2N 87.7W

March 25th, 2012 Category: Clouds, Lakes, Sediments

Central America - March 11th, 2012

Sediments drain out of the Gulf of Fonseca (center) and into the Pacific Ocean in this image of Central America. The Gulf of Fonseca borders El Salvador, Honduras and Nicaragua and covers an area of approximately 3,200 square kilometres (1,200 sq mi), with a coastline that extends for 261 kilometres (162 mi), of which 185 kilometres (115 mi) are in Honduras, 40 kilometres (25 mi) in Nicaragua, and 29 kilometres (18 mi) in El Salvador.

Visible to the southeast of the gulf is Lake Managua, in Nicaragua. At 1,042 km², it is approximately 65 km long and 25 km wide. The city of Managua, the capital of Nicaragua, lies on its southwestern shore. The lake has been severely polluted, mostly by decades of sewage being dumped into the lake.

In the upper part of the image, popcorn clouds hang over heavily forested areas – a common phenomenon due to clouds forming around the water vapor released from photosynthesizing plants.

Sediments in Gulf of Fonseca, Central America

13.2N 87.7W

March 11th, 2012 Category: Sediments

Nicaragua, Honduras, El Salvador - December 23rd, 2011

Visible below the clouds in this image of Central America is the Gulf of Fonseca, which covers an area of approximately 3,200 square kilometres (1,200 sq mi). The gulf has a coastline that extends for 261 kilometres (162 mi), of which 185 kilometres (115 mi) are in Honduras, 40 kilometres (25 mi) in Nicaragua, and 29 kilometres (18 mi) in El Salvador.

More sediments are present on the eastern side of the gulf, as is evidenced by the brownish color of the water in that area, while the rest of the gulf appears mostly green to blue. As it is currently the dry season in the region, less water flows into the Gulf, and the currents tend to flow inward from the Pacific Ocean, resulting in a increase in levels of salinity in the estuaries.

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