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Posts tagged Hawaii

Haleakalā, Eastern Volcano of Maui, USA

20.7N 156.3W

January 30th, 2012 Category: Volcanoes

USA - December 25th, 2011

This orthorectified image shows the island of Maui, the second-largest of the Hawaiian Islands at 727.2 square miles (1,883 km2) and the 17th largest island in the United States. Maui’s diverse landscapes are the result of a unique combination of geology, topography, and climate. Each volcanic cone in the chain of the Hawaiian Islands is built of dark, iron-rich/quartz-poor rocks, which poured out of thousands of vents as highly fluid lava, over a period of millions of years. Several of the volcanoes were close enough to each other that lava flows on their flanks overlapped one another, merging into a single island.

Maui is such a “volcanic doublet”, formed from two shield volcanoes that overlapped one another to form an isthmus between them. This image focuses on the larger, younger volcano to the east, Haleakalā, which rises to more than 10,000 feet (3,000 m) above sea level, but measures 5 miles (8.0 km) from seafloor to summit, making it one of the world’s highest “mountains”. The eastern flanks of the volcano are cut by deeply incised valleys and steep-sided ravines that run downslope to the rocky, windswept shoreline.

Rough Appearance of Mauna Kea Volcano in Hawaii, USA – May 4th, 2011

19.8N 155.4W

May 4th, 2011 Category: Image of the day, Volcanoes

USA – April 28th, 2011

This orthorectified image shows the slopes of Mauna Kea, a dormant volcano on the island of Hawai`i. Standing 4205 m above sea level, its peak is the highest point in the state of Hawaii.

In its current post-shield state, its lava is more viscous, resulting in a steeper profile. Late volcanism has also given it a much rougher appearance than its neighboring volcanoes; contributing factors include the construction of cinder cones, the decentralization of its rift zones, the glaciation on its peak, and the weathering effects of the prevailing trade winds.

Vegetation Around Mauna Loa Volcano on Hawaii, USA – January 4th, 2011

21.1N 157.2W

January 4th, 2011 Category: Image of the day, Volcanoes

USA - December 26th, 2010

The island of Hawaii occupies virtually all of this thumbnail image, while several other of the Hawaiian Islands can be observed in the full version.

The island shows terrain of mixed colors, mainly shades of green and brown. The green areas indicate forests and vegetation, while the brown areas are volcanic. The dark brown area in the center of the island is the Mauna Loa volcano. The darkest brown areas are mostly lava flows on the volcano’s relatively shallow slopes.

Medium Chance of Tropical Cyclone Development Near Hawaii

16.7N 153.7W

September 23rd, 2010 Category: Tropical Storms

Area of Low Pressure Near Hawaii - September 22nd, 2010

Enhanced image

Enhanced image

Track of Low Pressure Area - September 22nd, 2010 © Univ. of Wisconsin

Track of Low Pressure Area

The area of showers and thunderstorms centered about 430 miles south of Hilo, Hawaii, has shown less overall organization over the past several hours.

The coverage and intensity of the thunderstorms within this area has weakened over the past 6 hours with most of the deep convection well removed from the low level center to the east and northeast.

Slow development of this feature is possible as it continues moving slowly toward the west at about 10 mph during the next couple of days. There is a medium chance, 30 percent, of this system becoming a tropical cyclone during the next 48 hours.

Contrasting Slopes of Mauna Loa and Mauna Kea, Hawaii, USA

19.8N 155.4W

July 22nd, 2010 Category: Volcanoes

USA - June 27th, 2010

USA - June 27th, 2010

This orthorectified image shows much of the island of Hawaii, USA. The island is formed by five volcanoes, two of which are prominent here: Mauna Loa and Mauna Kea.

The former occupies the lower half of the image; its caldera is clearly visible in the lower right quadrant. The latter can be seen in the upper right quadrant. Its sides appear rougher than those of Mauna Loa, whose slopes are relatively shallow.

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