Earth Snapshot RSS Feed Twitter
 
 
 
 

Posts tagged Gulf of Gabes

Golden Sands of the Grand Erg Oriental, Algeria and Tunisia

31.5N 7.4E

October 17th, 2011 Category: Deserts, Salt Flats

Tunisia and Algeria - October 13th, 2011

Greenish sediments can be seen in the Gulf of Gabes off the coast of Tunisia between the Kerkennah Islands, an archipelago with an area of 160 km2, and Djerba (south of the former), the largest island of North Africa at 514 km².

The large tan area inland, west of Djerba, is the Chott el Djerid, a large endorheic salt lake in southern Tunisia. It is the largest salt pan of the Sahara Desert. Moving southward, one comes to the golden yellow expanse of the Grand Erg Oriental, a sand dune sea stretching across Algeria to Tunisia.

Djerba and Kerkennah Islands by Tunisia

33.8N 10.8E

July 10th, 2011 Category: Deserts, Salt Flats

Tunisia - July 4th, 2011

Visible off the coast of Tunisia in this image are the Kerkennah Islands (top right corner), an archipelago with an area of 160 km2, and Djerba (south of the former), the largest island of North Africa at 514 km², located in the Gulf of Gabes, off the coast of Tunisia.

Moving inland, west of Djerba, is the Chott el Djerid, a large endorheic salt lake in southern Tunisia. It is the largest salt pan of the Sahara Desert. South of this salt pan is the Grand Erg Oriental, a large sand dune sea.

Green Waters Around Djerba and the Kerkennah Islands, Tunisia

33.8N 10.8E

November 13th, 2009 Category: Snapshots

Tunisia - September 24th, 2009

Tunisia - September 24th, 2009

The water around the shores of eastern mainland Tunisia, the island of Djerba (below) and the Kerkennah Islands (above), and in the Gulf of Gabès (center left) and Gulf of  Boughrara (below Djerba) show various shades of green, ranging from light and bluish to dark and brownish.

Some of the dark green color may be caused by two species of green algae that have a tendency of invading the coast of Tunisia and are often found around the Kerkennah Islands.

Algal Growth Around Kerkennah Islands, Tunisia

34.7N 11.0E

September 4th, 2009 Category: Snapshots

Tunisia - July 26th, 2009

Tunisia - July 26th, 2009

The shorelines of the eastern coast of mainland Tunisia, the island of Djerba (below center) and the Kerkennah Islands (top center) appear very sharp in contrast with the dark waters of the Gulf of Gabès (left) and the Mediterranean Sea.

Upon closer examination, the dark blue sea waters also appear to contain some dark green algae, particularly around the Kerkennah islands and along the coast east of Djerba.

Two species of the green algae are considered as invasive in Tunisia and are found in many places along the central and southern Tunisian coast, and even in the North of the country in colder water. These species are frequently encountered around the Kerkennah Islands.

Kerkennah Islands, Tunisia

34.7N 11.0E

June 7th, 2009 Category: Image of the day

Kerkennah Islands, Tunisia - May 30th, 2009

Kerkennah Islands, Tunisia - May 30th, 2009

The Kerkennah Islands are a group of islands lying off the east coast of Tunisia in the Gulf of Gabes. The islands are low-lying, at no more than 13 metres above sea level.

The main islands are Chergui (right) and Gharbi (left). The archipelago has an area of 160 km2 and a population of 14,400 (as of 2006).

The green coloring around the islands, particularly northeast of Chergui, is due mostly to bottom reflection in the shallow, clear waters around the archipelago, and not to runoff or algal blooms.

The islands are warm and dry, with strong prevailing winds. This is mainly due to its positioning in the Gulf of Gabes, with strong sea winds (Gharbi), carried over the mainland, making them hot and dry.

What little water vapour there is, is lost over cooler Tunisia first. This causes the general ecology of the island to mainly consist of tall flora, such as palms and saltbushes.

The land is arid, as if desertification was imminent. Fishing, rather than agriculture, therefore, is the key industry. To this day, Kerkennah has been relatively untouched by modernization, and remains beautiful in its natural state.

About Us

Earth Observation

Organisations

Archive

July 2018
M T W T F S S
« Mar    
 1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
3031  

Categories


Bulletin Board


Featured Posts

Information

28


Take Action

Widgets