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Posts tagged Gulf of Batabanó

Brilliant Colors of Gulf of Batabanó, Cuba – February 10th, 2013

21.9N 82.7W

February 10th, 2013 Category: Image of the day

Cuba – January 25th, 2013

The Gulf of Batabanó is an inlet or strait off southwestern Cuba in the Caribbean Sea, separating mainland Cuba from the Isle of Youth. It is easily recognizable here by its bright, turquoise blue color. The northeastern section of the bay, called the Ensenada de la Broa, on the other hand, appears darker green, probably due to an influx of sediments and algal growth. The gulf’s bright blue waters are in part due to their shallow depth: less than 200 feet (61 m).

Florida Everglades and Sediments in the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea – December 25th, 2012

24.3N 86.2W

December 25th, 2012 Category: Image of the day, Sediments

USA, Mexico and Cuba – December 22nd, 2012

Sediments can be seen along the southwestern coast of Florida, USA (upper right), in the Gulf of Batabanó, Cuba (center right), along the western and northern coasts of the Yucatán Peninsula, Mexico (lower left) and by the Mississippi River Delta in Louisiana, USA (upper left). In the former three, the bright, light color is in part due to sediments and in part due to shallower depths.

Of particular note in Florida are the Everglades. Beginning in 1948 with the creation of the Central and Southern Florida (C&SF) Flood Control Project, much of the original greater Everglades ecosystem was drained in an effort to create a system of canals and dikes that would control the flow of water and accommodate agriculture and urban development. Some 50 percent of the original Everglades has been lost to agriculture and development but the majority of the remaining original Everglades acreage is now protected in a national park, national wildlife refuge, and water conservation areas.

Gulf of Batabanó and Guanahacabibes Peninsula, Cuba

22.4N 83.7W

January 28th, 2012 Category: Sediments

Cuba - December 18th, 2012

The Gulf of Batabanó, off southwestern Cuba, appears bright blue and green due to its shallow waters, sediments and algal growth. The waters of the northeastern extension of the gulf, called Ensenada de la Broa, are a darker green color.

The Gulf of Batabanó is an inlet or strait in the Caribbean Sea, separating mainland Cuba (above) from the Isle of Youth (below). The gulf is shallow–less than 200 feet (61 m) deep–and contains about 350 smaller islands of the Canarreos Archipelago (Archipiélago de los Canarreos) besides the Isle of Youth.

Visible at the left edge of the image is the Guanahacabibes Peninsula, the westernmost point on the island of Cuba. It is located in Pinar del Río Province, in the municipality of Sandino and is sparsely populated. It also boasts the category of Biosphere Reserve, listed by UNESCO in 1987. Its location in the open waters of the Gulf of Mexico makes it vulnerable to hurricanes.

Sediments in Gulf of Batabanó, Cuba

22.5N 82.4W

November 30th, 2011 Category: Sediments

Cuba - November 21st, 2011

The Gulf of Batabanó is an inlet or strait off southwestern Cuba in the Caribbean Sea, separating mainland Cuba (above) from the Isle of Youth (below). The gulf is shallow–less than 200 feet (61 m) deep–and contains about 350 smaller islands of the Canarreos Archipelago (Archipiélago de los Canarreos) besides the Isle of Youth. Here, this shallower depth combined with the presence of sediments in the waters give the gulf a lighter blue color than the nearby sea.

The gulf’s northern border begins at the southern coast of Cuba in Pinar del Río Province, Havana Province, and Matanzas Province, ending at the Zapata Peninsula (Península de Zapata), a length of about 80 miles (130 km). The northeastern section of the gulf is also called Ensenada de la Broa. The gulf stretches south about 50 miles (80 km) to the Isle of Youth.

Ensenada de la Broa and Gulf of Batabanó, Cuba

February 2nd, 2011 Category: Sediments

Cuba - January 16th, 2011

The Gulf of Batabanó is an inlet or strait off southwestern Cuba in the Caribbean Sea, separating mainland Cuba (above) from the Isle of Youth below). The gulf’s shallow depth, combined with the presence of sediments and algae, give it its bright teal color.

The part of the gulf to the north that appears darker green in color is the Ensenada de la Broa, a bay in southern Cuba in the provinces of Matanzas and Havana.