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Posts tagged Guadiana River

Sediments in Gulf of Cádiz, Spain and Portugal

36.5N 6.2W

December 20th, 2011 Category: Sediments

Spain and Portugal - December 18th, 2011

This image stretches across Portugal (left) to Spain (center and right). Sediments can be observed along the west coast of Portugal and the shores of the Gulf of Cádiz, the arm of the Atlantic Ocean between Cape St. Vincent (Cabo de São Vicente) in Portugal and Cape Trafalgar (Cabo Trafalgar) at the western end of the Strait of Gibraltar.

Two major rivers, the Guadalquivir and the Guadiana, as well as smaller rivers, like the Odiel, the Tinto, and the Guadalete, reach the ocean here. The Strait of Gibraltar can be seen at the lower right, with part of Morocco partially visible by the clouds at the bottom edge.

Estuaries and Lakes of Tagus, Sado and Guadiana Rivers, Portugal – April 22nd, 2011

38.5N 8.8W

April 22nd, 2011 Category: Image of the day, Lakes, Rivers

Spain and Portugal - April 15th, 2011

The Tagus River appears as a dark line flowing through a tan valley on the left side of this image of Portugal. The river reaches its large estuary near Lisbon, the country’s capital. Sediments cause the northern part of the estuary to differ in color from the southern part.

Two other large bodies of water can also be observed. One is the estuary of the Sado River by the city of Setúbal, southeast of the Tagus Estuary. The second is the Alqueva Reservoir, an artificial lake on the Guadiana River by the Spain-Portugal border.

 

Tagus and Guadiana Rivers in Portugal and Spain

July 29th, 2010 Category: Lakes, Rivers

Spain and Portugal - June 29th, 2010

Spain and Portugal - June 29th, 2010

This image spans much of Portugal (left) and western Spain (right). The land appears drier to the south, in both countries, and in the portion of Spain visible in the upper right quadrant.

Due to this dryness, irrigation is important. The reservoir created by the Alqueva Dam, bottom center, along the Guadiana River is used for irrigation and hydroelectric power. Following the river to the north, many areas of green agriculture can be seen near its banks.

West of the reservoir, in the lower left corner, is the Tagus River estuary, brownish due to sediments. The city of Lisbon, Portugal’s capital, is located on the shores of the estuary.

Reservoir of Alqueva Dam in Alentejo, Portugal

July 20th, 2010 Category: Lakes, Rivers

Spain and Portugal - June 29th, 2010

Spain and Portugal - June 29th, 2010

Sun glint frames the southern coast of Portugal with a silvery glow, lending that same color to several lakes to the north. The largest of these lakes is the reservoir created by the Alqueva Dam along the Guadiana River.

The reservoir is Portugal and Western Europe’s largest. It is situated in the Alentejo region, the driest and hottest of Portugal. The complex project was made to produce hydroelectric power, irrigation for farms in the surrounding area, as well as the large reservoir.

Moving to the northeast across the Spanish border, several other artificial reservoirs can be observed as well. Not affected by sun glint, they appear blue and green. The two largest are the Serena Reservoir (below, green) and the Orellana Reservoir (above, blue).

Alqueva Reservoir on Guadiana River, Portugal

38.2N 7.5W

June 8th, 2009 Category: Lakes, Rivers

Alqueva Reservoir, Portugal - May 30th, 2009

Alqueva Reservoir, Portugal - May 30th, 2009

The Alqueva Dam is located on the Guadiana River in the Alentejo region. The reservoir it has created is Portugal and Western Europe’s largest. Here, the land west of the lake belongs to Portugal, while that to the east is part of Spain.

Alentejo is the driest and hottest region in Portugal, and persistent droughts are a problem. The climate and a lack of infrastructure have impeded economic development and isolated the area from the national and European economies.

The complex project was made to produce hydroelectric power, irrigation for farms in the surrounding area, as well as a large reservoir. Agricultural areas can be seen near the lake.

On February 8, 2002, the 96 metre high floodgates of the Alqueva dam were closed. In 2006 the lake was filled to the planned level, with a surface area of 250 km².

In 2004, the hydroelectric power station started to work, with a capacity of 240 megawatt. As of 2025 (though the endeavour is already slated to be finished by 2013), the lake should supply irrigation water for 1,100 km² in the Alentejo.