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Posts tagged Guadalquivir River

Guadalquivir River Releasing Thick Tan Sediments into Gulf of Cádiz, Spain – January 11th, 2011

36.8N 6.3W

January 11th, 2011 Category: Image of the day, Rivers, Sediments

Spain - December 26th, 2010

Thick tan sediments spill forth from the mouth of the Guadalquivir River and line the coast of Spain, northwest of the Strait of Gibraltar (bottom right corner, partially covered by clouds).

The Guadalquivir is the second longest river in Spain, at 657 kilometers long. Its source is in the Cazorla mountain range, and its terminus by the fishing village of Bonanza, in Sanlúcar de Barrameda, flowing into the Gulf of Cádiz, in the Atlantic Ocean.

Strait of Gibraltar Between Spain and Morocco

35.9N 5.5W

July 22nd, 2010 Category: Rivers

Spain - June 26th, 2010

Spain - June 26th, 2010

The Strait of Gibraltar is a narrow strait that connects the Atlantic Ocean to the Mediterranean Sea and separates Spain in Europe from Morocco in Africa. The two continents are separated by 7.7 nautical miles (14.24 km) of ocean at the strait’s narrowest point.

The British overseas territory of Gibraltar is visible on the northern shores of the strait as a pointed peninsula east of a rounded bay. Moving around the coast to the west, the Guadalquivir River can be seen discharging greenish sediments.

Agricultural Area by Guadalquivir River South of Seville, Spain

37.3N 5.9W

July 10th, 2010 Category: Rivers

Spain - June 26th, 2010

Spain - June 26th, 2010

This APM image shows part of southern Spain. The city of Seville can be seen as a bright yellow area in the upper right corner. Upon opening the full image, the cities of Jerez de la Frontera, a greenish yellow circular area near the right edge, and Cadiz, another greenish yellow spot on a narrow spit of land surrounded by the sea, can be seen as well.

The bright green area near the shore is part of the Doñana National Park, while the greenish grey area further inland along the Guadalquivir River is an irrigated agricultural zone. In the full image, many square and rectangular fields can be distinguished.

Sediments in the Gulf of Cádiz, Spain – February 12th, 2010

36.8N 6.3W

February 12th, 2010 Category: Image of the day, Rivers, Sediments

Spain and Strait of Gibraltar - January 8th, 2010

Spain and Strait of Gibraltar - January 8th, 2010

Sediments line the coast of Spain and flow far out into the Atlantic Ocean northwest of the Strait of Gibraltar. Most of these come from the Guadalquivir River, which can be observed in the full image as a tan ribbon across the landscape. Further down the coast, near the city of Cadiz, the Guadalete River can also be seen discharging a lesser amount of sediments.

The Guadalquivir is the second longest river in Spain, at 657 kilometers long, and the only great navigable river in the country. It rises in the Cazorla mountain range and terminates by the fishing village of Bonanza, in Sanlúcar de Barrameda, flowing into the Gulf of Cádiz, in the Atlantic Ocean.

The Guadalete River, on the other hand, is smaller and shorter, running for 172 km into the Bay of Cádiz at El Puerto de Santa Maria, south of the city of Cádiz.

Doñana National Park, Spain

37.0N 6.4W

June 6th, 2009 Category: Snapshots

Doñana National Park, Spain - May 30th, 2009

Doñana National Park, Spain - May 30th, 2009

The Spanish land along the Gulf of Cádiz sports a varid terrain. Of particular interest is the tan, sandy area along the coast, which is part of the Doñana National Park  and wildlife refuge.

Doñana National Park is located in Andalusia, in the provinces of Huelva and Seville, and covers 543 km², of which 135 km² are a protected area. The park is an area of marsh, shallow streams, and sand dunes in Las Marismas, the Guadalquivir River Delta region where it flows into the Atlantic Ocean.

The original area was established in 1963 when the World Wildlife Fund joined with the Spanish government and purchased a section of marshes to protect it from the constant threat of draining the marshes, using the river water to boost agricultural production by irrigating land along the coast, and expanding tourist facilities.

Such drained marshes and agricultural lands are visible above the park, around the  tan  line of the Guadalquivir River. The light green areas are used for agriculture, while the bright green and greyish tan patches are salt flats from which salt is extracted for commercial purposes.