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Posts tagged Gran Desierto de Altar

Gran Desierto de Altar Near Gulf of California, Mexico

31.9N 114.2W

March 23rd, 2013 Category: Deserts

USA and Mexico – March 22nd, 2013

Arid landscapes are very sensitive to climate change and surface transformations. Here, one such arid area is the Gran Desierto de Altar, one of the major portions of the Sonoran Desert of Mexico, including the only active erg dune region in North America. It extends across much of the northern border of the Gulf of California, reaching more than 100 kilometers east to west, and over 50 km north to south, and constitutes the largest continuous wilderness area within the Sonoran Desert.

Salton Sea, Gran Desierto de Altar and Mouth of Colorado River, USA and Mexico

33.2N 115.7W

October 26th, 2012 Category: Deserts, Lakes, Rivers, Sediments

USA and Mexico – October 26th, 2012

Visible in the upper left quadrant of this image is the Salton Sea, a huge but shallow, saline, endorheic rift lake located directly on the San Andreas Fault, predominantly in California’s Imperial and Coachella Valleys.

The lake occupies the lowest elevations of the Salton Sink in the Colorado Desert of Imperial and Riverside counties in Southern California. The sea is fed by the New, Whitewater, and Alamo rivers, as well as agricultural runoff drainage systems and creeks. Visible south of the sea is irrigated land in southern California and Mexico.

In the lower right quadrant, sediments from the Colorado River can be observed spilling into the Gulf of California or Sea of Cortez. The Gran Desierto de Altar, one of the major portions of the Sonoran Desert of Mexico, can also be seen extending across much of the northern border of the Gulf of California. It reaches more than 100 kilometers east to west, and over 50 km north to south, and constitutes the largest continuous wilderness area within the Sonoran Desert, as well as including the only active erg dune region in North America.

Desert Features Near Gulf of California, USA and Mexico

33.2N 115.7W

April 1st, 2012 Category: Deserts, Lakes

USA - March 31st, 2012

This image stretches from southwestern USA (above) to northwestern Mexico (below). Several interesting geographical features can be observed near the border between the two countries. Near the center of the left edge is the Salton Sea, which provides irrigation for the crops seen growing in the otherwise desert area southeast of the lake. This desert area, part of the Gran Desierto de Altar, reaches the Gulf of California (Sea of Cortez). Sediments from the Colorado River can be seen pouring into the northern end of the gulf.

Salton Sea and Gran Desierto de Altar Near Gulf of California, USA and Mexico

33.2N 115.7W

February 22nd, 2012 Category: Deserts, Lakes

USA and Mexico - January 2nd, 2012

Visible as a navy blue area near the center of the left edge of this image of western USA and northwestern Mexico is the Salton Sea, a shallow, saline, endorheic rift lake located directly on the San Andreas Fault, predominantly in California’s Imperial Valley. The lake occupies the lowest elevations of the Salton Sink in the Colorado Desert of Imperial and Riverside counties in Southern California.

While it varies in dimensions and area with fluctuations in agricultural runoff and rainfall, the Salton Sea averages 15 mi (24 km) by 35 mi (56 km). With an average area of roughly 525 sq mi (1,360 km2), the Salton Sea is the largest lake in California. Average annual inflow is 1,360,000 acre·ft (1.68 km3), which is enough to maintain a maximum depth of 52 ft (16 m) and a total volume of about 7,500,000 acre·ft (9.3 km3).

An agricultural area can be seen south of the lake, near the edge of the Gran Desierto de Altar, one of the major portions of the Sonoran Desert of Mexico, including the only active erg dune region in North America. It extends across much of the northern border of the Gulf of California, reaching more than 100 kilometers east to west, and over 50 km north to south, and constitutes the largest continuous wilderness area within the Sonoran Desert.

The Gran Desierto covers approximately 5,700 km2, most of it in the Mexican state of Sonora. The northernmost edges overlap the border into southwestern Arizona. The dominant sand sheets and dunes range in thickness from less than one meter to greater than 120 meters. The total volume of sand in the Gran Desierto is about 60 km3. Most of that volume was delivered by the Pleistocene Colorado River which flowed through the present-day Gran Desierto area. The present-day Colorado River can be seen emptying sediments into the northern part of the Sea of Cortez (Gulf of California).

Colorado River Mouth and Gran Desierto de Altar, USA and Mexico – November 24th, 2011

31.9N 114.4W

November 24th, 2011 Category: Deserts, Image of the day, Rivers, Volcanoes

Mexico - November 23rd, 2011

The Colorado River is a river in the Southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico, approximately 2,330 kilometers (1,450 mi) long. Here, it can be seen at its mouth, empyting tan sediments into the Gulf of California between the Baja California peninsula and mainland Mexico.

Visible extending across much of the northern border of the Gulf of California, is the Gran Desierto de Altar. One of the major portions of the Sonoran Desert of Mexico, including the only active erg dune region in North America, it reaches more than 100 kilometers east to west, and over 50 km north to south.

The dark brown area amidst the desert sands is the Pinacate Peaks (Sierra Pinacate), a group of volcanic peaks and cinder cones located mostly in the Mexican state of Sonora along the international border adjacent to the U.S. state of Arizona, surrounded by the vast sand dune field of the Gran Desierto de Altar, at the desert’s southeast.

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