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Posts tagged Gran Chaco

Andes Mountains Separating Altiplano and Gran Chaco, Bolivia

17.8S 64.8W

September 16th, 2012 Category: Fires, Lakes, Mountains, Salt Flats

Bolivia and Peru – August 31st, 2012

The ridges of the Andes Mountains mark the division between two starkly contrasting regions in Bolivia: the arid altiplanto (left) and the hot and semi-arid lowlands of the Gran Chaco (sometimes referred to as the Chaco Plain). Visible by the left edge are the bright white salt flats of the Salar de Uyuni and the greenish waters of Lake Poopó. Of note in the upper right corner is smoke from fires that have been affecting the country recently (click here for previous images).

Gran Chaco and Paraná River, Argentina and Paraguay

22.3S 60W

December 18th, 2010 Category: Rivers

Argentina and Paraguay - December 14th, 2010

While much of the land in northeastern Argentina and Paraguay appear green and fertile, populated and agricultural zones have a lighter brown color. Dark green areas are visible near the Paraná River, flowing more or less vertically down the right side of the image.

The tan area in the upper left quadrant is part of the Gran Chaco, a sparsely populated, hot and semi-arid lowland region of the Río de la Plata basin, divided among eastern Bolivia, Paraguay, northern Argentina and a portion of the Brazilian states of Mato Grosso and Mato Grosso do Sul, where it is connected with the Pantanal region. This land is sometimes called the Chaco Plain.

Agriculture in the Chaco Boreal, Paraguay

22.3S 60W

February 5th, 2010 Category: Snapshots

Paraguay - January 25th, 2010

Paraguay - January 25th, 2010

The Gran Chaco is a sparsely populated, hot and semi-arid lowland region of the Río de la Plata basin, divided between eastern Bolivia, Paraguay, northern Argentina and a portion of the Brazilian states of Mato Grosso and Mato Grosso do Sul, where it is connected with the Pantanal region. This land is sometimes called the Chaco Plain.

Historically the Chaco has been divided in three main parts: the Chaco Austral or Southern Chaco, inside Argentinian territory; the Chaco Central or Central Chaco, also now in Argentinian territory; and the Chaco Boreal or Northern Chaco, inside Paraguayan territory and sharing some area with Bolivia.

This image focuses on the Chaco Boreal in Paraguay. The area in the center appears tan due to agricultural fields, many of which are near mennonite colonies. Inside Paraguay, people sometimes use the expression Central Chaco to refer to this area, located roughly in the middle of the Chaco Boreal, where such mennonite colonies are established.

The Chaco offers high soil fertility and a topography that is favorable for agricultural development, but in combination with aspects that are challenging for farming: a semi-arid to semi-humid climate (600–1300 mm annual rainfall) with a six-month dry season and sufficient fresh groundwater available only in roughly one third of the region, the remainig aquifers been too salty.

Altiplano, Mountains and Chaco in South America

19.8S 63.9W

August 1st, 2009 Category: Rivers

Bolivia - June 29th, 2009

Bolivia - June 29th, 2009

Most of the visible terrain on both sides of the Andes Mountains in this images belongs to Bolivia, while much of the cloud-covered area is part of Paraguay and some of the lower left quadrant is part of Argentina.

To the east of the Andes is a region known as the Gran Chaco, a sparsely populated, hot and semi-arid lowland region of the Río de la Plata basin. To the west lies the Bolivian Altiplano, an area of inland drainage (endorheism) with an average height of about 3,300 meters (11,000 feet).

Several rivers flow down from the mountains, across the green Bolivian terrain: the first three, from top to bottom, are the Rio Grande (also called the Guapay), Parapeti River and Pilcomayo River. All of these are golden brown in color from the load of sediments they are carrying.

Agriculture in Paraguay’s Gran Chaco – March 23rd, 2009

March 23rd, 2009 Category: Image of the day

Paraguay - March 16th, 2009

Paraguay - March 16th, 2009

Close-up

Close-up

The Gran Chaco is located west of the Paraguay River and east of the Andes, mostly an aluvial sedimentary plain shared between Paraguay, Bolivia and Argentina.

It is about 647,500 km2 (250,001 sq mi) in size, though estimates differ. The area visible here is located entirely in Paraguay.

The areas more hospitable to development are along the Paraguay, Bermejo and Pilcomayo Rivers.

The Chaco offers high soil fertility and a topography that is favorable for agricultural development, but in combination with aspects that are challenging for farming: A semi-arid to semi-humid climate (600-1300mm anual rainfall) with a 6 month dry season and sufficient sweet ground water available only in roughly one third of the region.

Many rectangular fields are visible in the light brown area upon which the close-up is focused. Several Mennonite colonies are located here, and the area has been deforested and developed for agriculture and cattle grazing.  The most important produce includes cotton, peanuts, beef, milk and other dairy products.

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