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Posts tagged Georgina River

Red Simpson Desert Sands and Channel Country, Australia – January 23rd, 2012

25.4S 138.2E

January 23rd, 2012 Category: Deserts, Image of the day, Lakes, Rivers

Australia - December 30th, 2011

The large, orange-red expanse in the upper left quadrant of this image is the Simpson Desert, a large area of dry, red sandy plain and dunes in Northern Territory, South Australia and Queensland in central Australia. It is the fourth largest Australian desert, with an area of 176,500 km² (68,100 sq mi).

Visible east of the desert is Australia’s Channel Country, a region of outback Australia located mostly in the state of Queensland but also in portions of South Australia, Northern Territory and New South Wales. The Channel Country features an arid landscape with a series of ancient flood plains from rivers which only flow intermittently. The numerous intertwined rivulets that cross the region cover 150,000 km². The principal rivers are Georgina River, Cooper Creek and the Diamantina River.

When there is sufficient rainfall in their catchment area these rivers flow into Lake Eyre, South Australia. Here, the land around the rivulets appears brown, indicating little water flowing through them and causing green vegetation to flourish, and Lake Eyre is mostly white, indicating that water has dried up and left salt flats exposed.

Simpson Desert, Channel Country and Lake Eyre, Australia – December 8th, 2011

25.4S 138.2E

December 8th, 2011 Category: Deserts, Image of the day, Lakes, Rivers

Australia - November 25th, 2011

The Simpson Desert (upper left quadrant) is a large area of dry, red sandy plain and dunes in Northern Territory, South Australia and Queensland in central Australia. It is the fourth largest Australian desert, with an area of 176,500 km² (68,100 sq mi).

Visible to the east of the desert is Australia’s Channel Country, a region of outback Australia located mostly in the state of Queensland but also in portions of South Australia, Northern Territory and New South Wales. The name comes from the numerous intertwined rivulets that cross the region. The principal rivers are Georgina River, Cooper Creek and the Diamantina River.

When there is sufficient rainfall in their catchment area these rivers flow into Lake Eyre, South Australia. Lake Eyre is visible at the bottom edge, its southwestern basin appearing green in color and its southeastern basin appearing pinkish, framed by white salt flats.

Rivers of Channel Country, Australia – April 14th, 2011

26.4S 140.3E

April 14th, 2011 Category: Image of the day, Rivers

Australia - March 31st, 2011

The paths of rivers in Australia’s Channel Country stand out as green and light tan lines against the surrounding rusty red landscape.

Channel Country is a region of outback Australia whose name comes from the numerous intertwined rivulets that cross the region, which cover 150,000 km².

It features an arid landscape with a series of ancient flood plains from rivers which only flow intermittently. The principal rivers are Georgina River, Cooper Creek and the Diamantina River.

Simpson Desert Bounded by Lake Eyre and Rivers, Australia

25.4S 138.2E

July 29th, 2010 Category: Lakes, Rivers

Australia - July 17th, 2010

Australia - July 17th, 2010

The Simpson Desert appears rusty red to the north and more tan to the south in this image of parts of central Australia. With a surface area of around 176 500 square kilometers, it spreads across the states of the Northern Territory, South Australia and Queensland.

It is bounded to east by the Georgina and Diamantina Rivers. Here, these rivers and others in Australia’s Channel Country, an arid area marked by a series of ancient flood plains from rivers which only flow intermittently (right side of image).

When very heavy rainfall occurs over time, these rivers flow into  Lake Eyre, a great salt lake that generally remains dry. Here, the lake is greenish in color to the south and more tan to the north.

Simpson Desert West of Diamantina River, Australia

25.4S 138.2E

May 4th, 2010 Category: Rivers

Australia - March 5th, 2010

Australia - March 5th, 2010

The Simpson Desert occupies approximately 176 500 square kilometers of central Australia. It is located within, and near the common boundaries of the Northern Territory, South Australia and Queensland states of Australia.

It is bounded to east by the Georgina and Diamantina Rivers, the latter of which is visible here to the right, with the ephemeral Lake Eyre to the south. Average annual rainfall is less than 5 inches (200 mm).

The Simpson Desert is an erg which contains the world’s longest parallel sand dunes. These north-south oriented dunes are static, held in position by vegetation. They vary in height from 3 metres in the west to around 30 metres on the eastern side.

Some of the heaviest rain in decades during 2009, and continuing into 2010, has seen the Simpson Desert burst into life and colour. Rain inundated Queensland’s north-west and Gulf regions. In total, 17 million megalitres of water entered the State’s western river systems leading to Lake Eyre. In 2010, researchers uncovered the courses of ancient river systems under the desert.