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Posts tagged Gambia River

Dust Near Cape Verde Islands – February 4th, 2013

11.9N 15W

February 4th, 2013 Category: Dust Storms, Image of the day

West Africa – February 2nd, 2013

Dust from the Sahara Desert blows off the coast of Mauritania, Senegal, the Gambia and Guinea Bissau (top to bottom, right side of image), towards the Cape Verde islands (upper left quadrant). As the dust appears thickest offshore, the Senegal River (upper right, forming the border between Senegal and Mauritania), the Gambia River (center of coastline) and the Geba River (lower part of coastline, marked by a wide, sediment-filled estuary) can be observed.

Dust from Senegal to Cape Verde Islands

14.7N 17.6W

January 8th, 2013 Category: Dust Storms, Sediments

West Africa – January 7th, 2013

Dust from the Sahara Desert blows off the coast of West Africa. Here, the dust is thickest off the coast of Senegal, north of the Cap Vert Peninsula, and spreads westward over the Cape Verde Islands (upper left edge). Visible south of the peninsula are sediments from rivers in Senegal and the Gambia including the Saloum, Gambia and Casamance (north to south) Rivers.

Cap Vert Between Senegal and Gambia Rivers, Senegal

14.7N 17.3W

February 23rd, 2012 Category: Rivers

Gambia and Senegal - January 31st, 2012

Visible at the top of this wide-swath ASAR image is the Sénégal River, a 1,790 km (1,110 mi) long river in West Africa that forms the border between Senegal and Mauritania. The Sénégal’s headwaters are the Semefé (Bakoye) and Bafing rivers which both originate in Guinea. Later in its course, the Senegal River flows through semi-arid land in the north of Senegal, forming the border with Mauritania, and into the Atlantic. It is separated from the Atlantic Ocean by a thin strip of sand called the Langue de Barbarie before it pours into the ocean itself.

Visible near the bottom edge is the Gambia River, which runs 1,130 kilometres (700 mi) from the Fouta Djallon plateau in north Guinea westward through Senegal and The Gambia to the Atlantic Ocean at the city of Banjul. About 100 km from its mouth it gradually widens to over 10 km wide where it meets the sea.

Protruding off the coast between the two rivers is Cap-Vert, a peninsula in Senegal, and the westernmost point of the continent of Africa and of the Old World mainland. Cap-Vert is a rocky promontory extending west from the main sandy areas of Senegal. Dakar, the capital of Senegal, is located near the southern tip. Twin volcanic cones, the Deux Mamelles (“Two Teats”), dominate the landscape along the coast northwest of Dakar.

Vegetation Index by Rivers of Western Africa

12.4N 16.4W

January 27th, 2012 Category: Rivers, Vegetation Index

Guinea Bissau - January 6th, 2012

This FAPAR image shows the vegetation index of the Gambia, Senegal and Guinea Bissau, in Western Africa. The index in Gambia and northern Senegal is quite low (yellow), with areas of good (green) photosynthetic activity visible only near the banks of the Gambia River.

To the south, the vegetation index is generally good, particularly near the coast and the Geba River, on on the offshore islands. Here, the distribution of activity appears to be the opposite of the pattern to the north: lower activity is visible by the banks of the rivers.

Saloum, Gambia and Geba Rivers Empyting into Atlantic Ocean Off Coast of West Africa

13.0N 16.4W

January 25th, 2012 Category: Rivers

Guinea Bissau - January 6th, 2012

Several rivers can be observed flowing into the Atlantic Ocean off the coast of West Africa. Visible in the upper left corner is the Saloum River. It rises about 105 kilometers east of Kaolack, Senegal, and flows to the Saloum Delta. Mangrove forests occupy a 5-kilometer belt on either side of the river almost 70 kilometers upstream.

South of the mouth of the Saloum is the mouth of the Gambia River.  It runs 1,130 kilometres (700 mi) from the Fouta Djallon plateau in north Guinea westward through Senegal and The Gambia to the Atlantic Ocean at the city of Banjul. About 100 km from its mouth it gradually widens to over 10 km wide where it meets the sea.

Further down the coast is the Geba River, easily spotted due to the heavy load of sediments it releases into the Atlantic. It rises in Guinea, passes through Senegal, and reaches the Atlantic Ocean in Guinea-Bissau. It is about 340 miles (550 km) in total length. After passing by Geba town and Bambadinca, the river broadens into a wide estuary below Xime (where it is joined by the Corubal River), with a total width of about 10 miles (16 km) at Bissau.