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Posts tagged Frisian Islands

Islands East and West of the Jutland Peninsula, Denmark and Germany

55.2N 8.5E

May 4th, 2011 Category: Sediments

Denmark and Germany - May 2nd, 2011

There are about 406 islands in Denmark, not including the Faroe Islands or Greenland. Some 70 of them are populated but the remainder are uninhabited. The largest islands include Funen (left) and Zealand (right), visible to the east of the Jutland peninsula.

Many other islands can be observed by the Germany-Denmark border on the west side of the peninsula. These are the Frisian Islands, also known as the Wadden Sea Islands.

The islands shield the mudflat region of the Wadden Sea (large parts of which fall dry during low tide) from the North Sea. Here, muddy tan sediments can be seen between the peninsula’s coast and the islands, and pour outwards from the mouth of the Elbe River in Germany.

Dutch Coastal Bodies of Water: Markermeer, IJsselmeer and Wadden Sea – May 31st, 2010

May 31st, 2010 Category: Image of the day, Lakes

Netherlands - April 18th, 2010

Netherlands - April 18th, 2010

Several bodies of water are visible near the coast of the Netherlands: the Markermeer (bright green), the IJsselmeer (dark blue) and the Wadden Sea (green, closest to the open ocean).

The Markermeer is a 700 km² lake in the central Netherlands in between North Holland, Flevoland and its larger sibling, the IJsselmeer. A shallow lake at some 3 to 5 m in depth, it is named after the small former island, now peninsula, of Marken that lies within it.

IJsselmeer (sometimes translated as Lake IJssel, alternative international spelling: Lake Yssel) is a shallow lake of 1100 km² in the central Netherlands bordering the provinces of Flevoland, North Holland and Friesland, with an average depth of 5 to 6 m. It is named after the IJssel river that drains into it via a smaller lake, the Ketelmeer. The IJsselmeer is the largest lake in Western Europe.

The Wadden Sea (Dutch: Waddenzee) is an intertidal zone in the southeastern part of the North Sea. It lies between the coast of northwestern continental Europe and the range of Frisian Islands, forming a shallow body of water with tidal flats and wetlands.

Frisian Islands Chain and Dikes in the Netherlands

May 13th, 2009 Category: Snapshots

The Netherlands - May 12th, 2009

The Netherlands - May 12th, 2009

The West Frisian Islands, in a chain off the coast of the Netherlands, separate the North Sea from the Wadden Sea, an intertidal zone between the continental coast and the islands.

While the North Sea is deeper and appears dark navy blue here, the Wadden Sea has a greenish brown color, as it is a shallow body of water with tidal flats and wetlands rich in biological diversity.

The biggest and most populated of the Frisian Islands is called Texel. It is also the westernmost of this archipelago, and forms the largest natural barrier between the two seas. The dune landscape on Texel is a unique habitat for wildlife.

Below Texel and the Wadden Sea is a body of water formerly known as the  Zuiderzee. After being closed off from the North Sea by a dike, it was separated into two lakes: the IJsselmeer and the Markermeer, which are in turn separated by another dike called the Houtribdijk.

These dikes are visible in the full image as lines where the color of the water changes abruptly from dark brown (Wadden Sea), to dark green (IJsselmeer) to bright green (Markermeer).

The Coastline of Denmark – May 6th, 2009

May 6th, 2009 Category: Image of the day

Denmark - April 23rd, 2009

Denmark - April 23rd, 2009

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The entire coastline of Denmark (center) is visible in this image, as well as parts of the shorelines of Germany (bottom),  Norway (top left) and Sweden (top right).

The main bodies of water visible include the North Sea (left) and the Baltic Sea(right), connected by the Skagerrak and Kattegat Straits (top center). Denmark has long controlled the approach to the Baltic Sea, and these waters are also known as the Danish Straits.

Denmark consists of a large peninsula, Jutland and many islands, most notably Zealand, as well as hundreds of minor islands often referred to as the Danish Archipelago. The peninsula and 443 named islands give the country a very long total coastline of 7,314 kilometres (4,544 mi).

The first close-up focuses on the western side of the Jutland Peninsula, near the border between Denmark and Germany. The islands here are called the Frisian Islands, in the Wadden Sea. The area is typified by extensive tidal mud flats and deeper tidal trenches.

The second close-up shows the top of the Jutland Peninsula and Denmark’s northernmost point, called Skagens Point. The country is flat with little elevation; having an average height above sea level of only 31 metres (102 ft).

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