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Climate Change’s Potential Effects on Coastal Florida

26.7N 82.1W

June 19th, 2013 Category: Climate Change VIIRSSuomi

USA – June 19th, 2013

Climate change poses a tremendous threat to Florida. Sea level rise, more intense precipitation, and stronger hurricanes increase the risk of natural disaster and imperil the state’s economy and its citizens’ safety. Compounding these dangers, increasing coastal population and development will put more people and property at danger. In years to come, those risks will lead to devastating damage if they are not mitigated.

One of the clearest impacts of climate change is the documented rise in sea levels, which has been taking place along Florida’s coasts at more than two centimeters per decade. Higher atmospheric temperatures heat the oceans and water expands as it warms. Sea levels rise further as melt waters from glaciers and continental ice sheets pour into the oceans at high latitudes. This process is expected to accelerate. Sea levels are projected to be three to seven inches higher by 2030 (over 2010), nine to 24 inches higher by 2060, and 39 inches higher by 2100, and the rise will continue long thereafter.

Even apart from larger storm surges, these sea level rises will have major impacts on coastal Florida, where 80 percent of the state’s population lives. Because so much of the shoreline is flat and low-lying, the impacts of even small rises extend far inland. Taking tidal variations into account, a one-foot rise can move the shoreline inward by more than a thousand feet. Most of this inundation will affect undeveloped land, especially in South Florida, replacing upland plant communities with mangroves and marshes and replacing those with tidal flats and open water. Commercial and recreational fisheries dependent on those coastal ecosystems and estuaries for spawning will be damaged along with many bird and animal populations

Andrea (01L) Merges With Frontal Zone, USA

33.3N 80.6W

June 8th, 2013 Category: Tropical Storms MODISTerra

Tropical Storm Andrea (01L) – June 8th, 2013

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Track of Tropical Storm Andrea (01L) - June 6th, 2013 © Univ. of Wisconsin

Track of TC 01L

By 2140 UTC on June 6, Tropical Storm Andrea (01L) had made landfall in Dixie County, Florida about 10 miles (16 km) south of Steinhatchee.

After moving inland, the storm initially weakened quickly, with winds decreasing to 45 mph (75 km/h) by early on June 7. The National Hurricane Center then noted that extratropical transition was likely within 24 hours and “could occur sooner if the convective structure does not improve.”

By later on June 7, most of the convection became displaced to the northwest due to dry air. Around that time, the storm began accelerating northeastward at 26 mph (42 km/h) due to an approaching mid-latitude trough.

Andrea then became indistinguishable with a frontal zone over North Carolina. Based on surface observations and doppler radar, the National Hurricane Center declared the storm extratropical at 2100 UTC on June 7.

Andrea Becomes Post-Tropical, Moves Up East Coast, USA

32.5N 81.3W

June 8th, 2013 Category: Tropical Storms MODISTerra

Tropical Storm Andrea (01L) – June 7th, 2013

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Track of Tropical Storm Andrea (01L) - June 6th, 2013 © Univ. of Wisconsin

Track of TC 01L

As of 11 p.m. EDT June 7 (0300 UTC June 8), Post-tropical Cyclone Andrea (01L) is located within 30 nautical miles of 38.5°N 75.0°W, about 15 miles (25 km) north-northeast of Ocean City, Maryland and about 30 miles (45 km) south of Cape May, New Jersey.

Maximum sustained winds are 40 knots (45 mph, 75 km/h), with stronger gusts. Minimum central pressure is 997 mbar (hPa; 29.44 InHg), and the system is moving northeast at 31 knots (35 mph, 56 km/h). Tropical storm force winds extend outward up to 230 miles (370 km) from the center of Andrea.

Tropical Storm Andrea (01L) West of Florida

27.6N 87.1W

June 7th, 2013 Category: Tropical Storms AVHRRMetOp

Tropical Storm Andrea (01L) – June 6th, 2013

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Track of Tropical Storm Andrea (01L) - June 6th, 2013 © Univ. of Wisconsin

Track of TC 01L

As of 11 p.m. EDT (0300 UTC) June 6, Tropical Storm Andrea (01L) is located within 20 nautical miles of 30.3°N 82.4°W, about 40 miles (65 km) west of Jacksonville, Florida and about 65 miles (105 km) east-southeast of Valdosta, Georgia.

Maximum sustained winds are 40 knots (45 mph, 75 km/h), with stronger gusts. Minimum central pressure is 993 mbar (hPa; 29.32 InHg), and the system is moving northeast at 13 knots (15 mph, 24 km/h). Tropical storm force winds extend outward up to 140 miles (220 km) from the center of Andrea.

Tropical Storm Andrea (01L) First of 2013 Atlantic Hurricane Season

25.1N 91W

June 6th, 2013 Category: Tropical Storms MODISAqua

Tropical Storm Andrea (01L) – June 6th, 2013

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Track of Tropical Storm Andrea (01L) - June 6th, 2013 © Univ. of Wisconsin

Track of TC 01L

In early June, the National Hurricane Center began monitoring an area of disturbed weather in the northwestward Caribbean Sea.

The system moved northward and slowly organized, despite strong wind shear. After a reconnaissance aircraft reported a closed circulation on June 5, the National Hurricane Center initiated advisories on Tropical Storm Andrea at 2200 UTC, while centered about 310 miles (500 km) southwest of Tampa, Florida.

Upon developing into a tropical cyclone on June 5, a tropical storm warning was issued from Boca Grande to the mouth of the Ochlockonee River in Florida. Additionally, a tropical storm watch was put into effect for Flagler Beach, Florida to Surf City, North Carolina. In Gulf Shores, Alabama, 10 swimmers had to be rescued due to strong rip currents on June 5.

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