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Posts tagged Fanele

Southern tip of Madagascar after Tropical Cyclone Passes

January 24th, 2009 Category: Rivers

Southern tip of Madagascar - January 22nd, 2009

Southern tip of Madagascar - January 22nd, 2009

Here, a river on the southwestern tip of Madagascar is visible as it drains into the Mozambique Strait. The image was taken the day after Tropical Cyclone 09S (Fanele) passed over the strait and the island of Madagascar.

The waters of the strait appear to have calmed since the cyclone passed over the area (click here to see image of choppy waters the day the storm hit).

Turbulent Waters in Mozambique Strait

January 23rd, 2009 Category: Snapshots, Tropical Cyclones

Mozambique Strait - January 21st, 2009

Mozambique Strait - January 21st, 2009

This radar (ASAR) image shows the Mozambique Strait, between the African continent and the island of Madagascar, as Tropical Cyclone 09S (Fanele) blew through the area two days ago.

The strong winds whipped up by the cyclone caused the strait’s waters to become extremely agitated. Upon reaching Madagascar, Fanele caused widespread heavy rains and flooding on land.

Area of Convection Persists Near Indonesia

January 23rd, 2009 Category: Tropical Cyclones

Area of convection near Indonesia - January 23rd, 2009

Area of convection near Indonesia - January 23rd, 2009

Position of area of convection

Position of area of convection

The area of convection previously located about 610 nautical miles north-northwest of Cocos Island is now approximately 490 nautical miles north-northwest of it.

Recent animated METSAT imagery and Quickscat data indicate a weak low level circulation, associated with flaring, disorganized convection.

The fact that the system has yet to become organized is clearly visible in both images.  In the grayshade enhanced image, Tropical Cyclone 09S (Fanele) can also be seen to the left, moving southward.

The disturbance is located in a region of upper level diffluence, and high vertical wind shear making the overall environment unfavorable for further development at this time.

Maximum sustained surface winds are estimated at 15 to 20 knots.

Minimum sesa level pressure is estimated to be near 1004mb. The potential for the development of a significant tropical cyclone within the next 24 hours remains poor.

source JTWC

Fanele Continues Southeastward, Away from Madagascar

January 23rd, 2009 Category: Tropical Cyclones

Tropical Cyclone 09S (Fanele) - January 23rd, 2009

Tropical Cyclone 09S (Fanele) - January 23rd, 2009

Tropical Cyclone 09S (Fanele) - enhanced image

Tropical Cyclone 09S (Fanele) - enhanced image

Tropical Cyclone 09S (Fanele), located approximately 370 nautical miles south-southeast of Antananarivo, Madagascar, has tracked southeastward at 19 knots over the past 6 hours.

The system will continue to weaken over the forecast period and complete extratropical transistion by TAU 12.

Maximum significant wave height is 10 feet.

This is the final warning on Fanele by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center.

The system will be closely monitored for signs of regeneration.

Position of Tropical Cyclone 09S (Fanele)

Position of Tropical Cyclone 09S (Fanele)

source JTWC

Area of Convection Approaches Indonesia

January 22nd, 2009 Category: Tropical Cyclones

Area of convection near Indonesia - January 22nd, 2009

Area of convection near Indonesia - January 22nd, 2009

Location of area of convection

Location of area of convection

An area of convection has persisted approximately 610 nautical miles north-northwest of Cocos Island.

The satellite image to the right shows some clouds related to the disturbance approaching Indonesia.

The image to the left, enhanced with inverted default grayshade, shows the entire area of convection (to the right). Tropical Cyclone 09S (Fanele) can also be seen (to the left) as it moves away from Madagascar and into open ocean (click here for updates on Fanele).

Regarding the convective area by Indonesia, recent animated imagery and data indicate a weak low level circulation, associated with flaring, disorganized convection.

The disturbance is located in a region of upper level diffluence, and high vertical wind shear, making the overall environment unstable for further development at this time.

Maximum sustained surface winds are estimated at 15 to 20 knots. Minimum sea level pressure is estimated to be near 1004mb.

The potential for the development of a significant tropical cyclone within the next 24 hours is poor.

source JTWC