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Posts tagged Dzhungarian Gate

Lakes and Mountains of Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan – October 13th, 2012

42.3N 77.2E

October 13th, 2012 Category: Lakes, Mountains

Kazakhstan – October 10th, 2012

Several lakes can be observed in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan, northwest of the Taklamakan Desert (lower right) in China. Nearest the desert is Lake Issyk Kul, an endorheic lake in the northern Tian Shan mountains in eastern Kyrgyzstan. Although it is surrounded by snow-capped peaks, it never freezes.

North of Lake Issyk Kul is Lake Balkhash, in southeastern Kazakhstan, belonging to an endorheic basin shared by Kazakhstan and China, with a small part in Kyrgyzstan. The basin drains into the lake via seven rivers, most notably the Ili River, which is fed from precipitation (largely vernal snowmelt) from the mountains of China’s Xinjiang region.

Visible to the east of Lake Balkhash, near the right edge of the image, is Lake Alakol, located in east central Kazakhstan. The lake is the northwest extension of the region known as the Dzhungarian Gate (Alataw Pass), a narrow, fault-bounded valley that connects the southern uplands of Kazakhstan with arid northwest China.

Lakes Alakol and Sasykkol, Kazakhstan

46.1N 81.7E

August 26th, 2012 Category: Lakes, Rivers

Kazakhstan – August 23rd, 2012

Two lakes can be observed in this image: Lake Alakol (blue) and Lake Sasykkol (light green). The latter is a lake in the eastern part of Kazakhstan. It has an area of 600 km² (736 km² when water level in the lake is high), average depth of 3.3 m and maximum depth of 4.7 m.

Lake Alakol is located in the Almaty and Shyghyz provinces, east central Kazakhstan. The lake is the northwest extension of the region known as the Dzhungarian Gate (Alataw Pass), a narrow valley that connects the southern uplands of Kazakhstan with arid northwest China.

Lake Alakol, a salt lake, has a drainage basin of 65,200 km² and receives water periodically from the southerly draining Urdzhar River at the north end of the lake. Two alluvial fans are visible where mountain streams cut through the faulted landscape (southwest side of lake).

Lake Alakol and Dzhungarian Gate, Kazakhstan

46.1N 81.7E

August 31st, 2011 Category: Lakes, Mountains

Kazakhstan - August 30th, 2011

Greenish sediments line the northwestern shores of Lake Alakol, meaning “motley lake” in Turkic, a lake located in the Almaty and Shyghyz provinces, east central Kazakhstan. Its elevation is 347 m above sea level.

The lake is the northwest extension of the region known as the Dzhungarian Gate (Alataw Pass), a narrow valley connects the southern uplands of Kazakhstan with arid northwest China. The Dzhungarian Gate is a fault-bounded valley (see vertical line on the image along the southwest side of the lake) where the elevation of the valley floor is between 350–450 m above sea level and the peaks of the Dzhungarsky Alatau range (lower left) reach 4,463 m above sea level.

Lakes Alakol and Sasykkol in the Dzhungarian Gate, Kazakhstan – September 27th, 2009

46.1N 81.7E

September 27th, 2009 Category: Image of the day, Lakes, Rivers

Kazakhstan - September 4th, 2009

Kazakhstan - September 4th, 2009

Lake Alakol, meaning “mottled lake” in Turkic, is a lake located at an altitude of 347 m in the Almaty and Shyghyz provinces of east central Kazakhstan, east of Lake Balqash. Here, green and tan sediments give it the mottled coloring for which it is named.

The lake is the northwest extension of the region known as the Dzhungarian Gate (Alataw Pass), a narrow valley connecting the southern uplands of Kazakhstan with arid northwest China.

The Dzhungarian Gate is a fault-bounded valley, appearing here as a vertical line along the south side of the lake, where the elevation of the valley floor is between 350-450 m above sea level while the peaks of the Dzhungarsky Alatau range (bottom) reach 4,463 m above sea level.

Lake Alakol, a salt lake, has a drainage basin of 65,200 km² and receives water periodically from the southerly draining Urdzhar River. The surface area of the lake is 2,650 km², its maximum depth 54 m, and its volume 58.6 km³.

A swampy, lowland connects the northwest end of Lake Alakol with the lighter-colored Lake Sasykkol (left of center). The Alakol State Sanctuary has been created to protect the area, for the lake is an important breeding and nesting ground for various wetland birds, notably the very rare Relict Gull.